Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - SOC Officials Learn New Approaches To Reforestation During Thai Tour



SOC Officials Learn New Approaches To Reforestation During Thai Tour

SOC Officials Learn New Approaches To Reforestation During Thai Tour

Two months ago forestry official Dr. Ing Mok Mareth wasn't sure what the State of

Cambodia's (SOC) position should be on eucalyptus plantations.

But things became clearer for him after a 10-day tour to Thailand last month-where

he talked with villagers who have lost their homes, seen their soil depleted and

eroded, and watched as natural forests around them were leveled to make way for eucalyptus

plantations.

"Now I understand about eucalyptus," said Mareth, SOC vice minister of

agriculture. "I don't agree with eucalyptus plantations. I don't like it in

big form, large plantations. Small scale is okay because it's fast growing and can

respond to the need for firewood and construction."

The forestry tour was organized by the Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) Cambodia

and a Thai NGO, the Project for Ecological Recovery.

Accompanying Mareth on the tour were Or Seuan, vice director of the SOC forestry

department, and Chhun Saretth, chief of the forestry department's technical office.

In Thailand, the Khmer officials visited plantations and community forests in six

northeastern provinces and met with Royal Thai Forestry Department and logging company

officials.

They also learned firsthand about "community forestry," previously largely

an environmental buzzword to them.

The term can mean anything from villagers planting and protecting trees near their

homes, to portions of natural forests being turned over to villagers to safeguard,

while allowing them to reap some of the benefits by collecting forest products.

"Vast areas of Cambodia can be reforested simply by protecting it and allowing

it to regenerate naturally-by giving local villagers the right to protect and use

that forest in a low-intensity way. It's much more cost effective than fencing the

forests or hiring guards," said Gordon Paterson of MCC, who accompanied the

delegation.

Contracts made with villagers could include giving them land tenure rights, letting

them interplant fruit trees within the forest, and allowing them to cut small amounts

of firewood for domestic use, Paterson said.

"The idea is to parcel out a threatened area for community management rather

than hand it over to foreign companies to plant eucalyptus," he said.

Over the past five years in northeastern Thailand, resettlement of farmers to make

way for eucalyptus plantations has caused bitter clashes between rural villagers

and the Thai forestry department.

In Ubon province the Khmer officials visited a village that had blocked the cutting

of a secondary forest for a eucalyptus plantation.

In Srisaket province delegates viewed "forest villages," government-supported

settlements for people displaced by eucalyptus plantations who are paid to continue

growing crops such as rice or fruit between the eucalyptus trees for up to three

years.

No provision is made for the villagers after the trees are grown and their crops

shaded out, Paterson said, and they are not eligible to share in the profits from

plantation harvesting.

"They can't support themselves, and the government considers them illegal encroachers,"

Paterson said.

In Surin the delegation viewed examples of "sustainable agriculture"-where

a diversity of indigenous species have been planted to restore deforested areas-as

well as "agroforestry" projects, where fruit trees have been planted on

irrigation dikes, enriching the soil while providing fruit as well.

While impressed with much of what he saw in Thailand, Mareth is adopting a cautious

approach to implementing any community forestry models in Cambodia, calling for an

"assessment" first.

"Now we have no law about community forestry," he said. "If we give

the forests directly to the villagers while we have no law, no experience, we might

destroy the forest."

The approach might work better in some parts of Cambodia than others, Mareth said.

"We need to study the traditions, lifestyles of people, case by case, in each

area," he said. "For example, in Kompong Speu the people make a living

by cutting firewood. It could be very difficult to organize [community forestry]

there."

MOST VIEWED

  • Seven positive for Covid-19, Hun Sen confirms local transmission

    Prime Minister Hun Sen announced that there has been local community transmission of Covid-19. However, he urged the people not to panic even though the Ministry of Health announced the discovery of seven new cases on Sunday. Among the victims are Chhem Savuth, the director-general

  • Cambodia at ‘most critical moment’, Hun Sen warns

    Prime Minister Hun Sen said the first community transmission of Covid-19 in Cambodia has led the country to the “most critical moment” that warranted urgent, large-scale operations to contain the pandemic. Hun Sen, who confirmed the first local transmission on November 28, said the source of

  • PM confirms community transmission, calls for unity

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has called on the public to stay calm, unite and follow the Ministry of Health guidelines after the wife of a senior official tested positive for Covid-19 in the Kingdom’s first case of community transmission. The case has drawn criticism

  • Over 110 garment factories close

    A government official said on November 22 that at least 110 garment factories had closed in the first nine months of the year and left more than 55,000 workers without jobs – but union leaders worry those numbers could be much higher. Ministry of Labour and Vocational Training undersecretary

  • Singapore group seeks $14M in damages from PPSP over ‘breach of contract’

    Singapore-based Asiatic Group (Holdings) Ltd is seeking a minimum of $14.4 million relief from Cambodia Securities Exchange (CSX)-listed Phnom Penh Special Economic Zone Plc (PPSP) for allegedly breaching a power plant joint venture (JV) agreement. Asiatic Group’s wholly-owned Colben System Pte Ltd and 95 per

  • PM vows to protect Hun family

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has vowed to continue his fight against opposition politicians who he said intend to smash the Hun family. Without naming the politicians but apparently referring to former leaders of the Supreme Court-dissolved Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP), Hun Sen said there