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Travel Facts

Travel Facts

  • 80 percent of Cambodia's highways and half of the capital's streets are in major

    need of repair according to the Ministry of Public Works.

  • Nearly 80 percent of the country's 4,000 major bridges have been seriously damaged

    in the past two decades.

  • The government's main transport priority is to rebuild a 291km stretch of Highway

    Five between Phnom Penh and Battambang province as a link to the Thai border.

  • Another government priority is to improve the first 30km of main roads leading

    from the capital.

  • Cambodia's principle road network consists of approximately 3,500km of national

    roads linking Phnom Penh to various provinces, and about 2,550km of sub-roads.

  • There are approximately 649km of operational railway line in Cambodia.
  • Most major roads constructed to international standards were laid since the 1960s.

    Today, the majority are not suitable for heavy vehicles or large traffic volume.

  • The Secretary of State at the Ministry of Public Works, Mr Tram Iv Tek, says

    his department's budget is insufficient to carry out primary tasks.

  • Between 1990-93 the State released only $550,000 annually to repair roads and

    bridges.

  • The Ministry of Public Works operates 230 obsolete Soviet vehicles.
  • The UN Development Program (UNDP) is spending $6.3m to improve Cambodia's infrastructure.
  • Since 1992, UNDP has been responsible for maintaining repairs along Highway Five.

    About 204km has been covered with gravel as a temporary measure.

  • UNDP is spending $2.5 million to replace six bridges totaling 334 meters.
  • Officially, Highway Five is safe for vehicles to travel 100 kph.
  • The Asian Development Bank has given Cambodia a soft loan of $32.5 million to

    help improve road and rail links and port facilities.

  • The US government has signed an exchange note with Cambodia to cover the repair

    of Highway Four from Phnom Penh to Kompong Som to the value of $24 million. The road,

    already regarded as the best in the country, was originally built in 1950 by United

    States grant aid.

  • The Japanese government is spending approximately $37.5 million rebuilding Phnom

    Penh's Chroy Changvar bridge. Additional funds have been allocated to lay asphalt

    along the first 45km of Highway Six from the bridge.

  • France has donated $3 million for a "road laboratory" to test materials

    and repair railway locomotives.

  • UNTAC engineering teams from Japan, China, Thailand and The Netherlands repaired

    324km of Highways Two, Five and Six and 517 meters of bridges.

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