Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Violent storms cause a number of deaths

Violent storms cause a number of deaths

Violent storms cause a number of deaths

A SIX-year-old girl survived a lightning strike that killed both her pregnant mother and her father in Kandal province’s Loeuk Dek district yesterday.

Srean Samun, who was five months pregnant, and her 37-year-old husband Long Samang were taking shelter in their wooden house – about 7 kilometres from Thmey village in Peam Raing commune – when it was struck by lightning.

Both were killed by the bolt but their six-year-old daughter, who was taking shelter with them, escaped unharmed.

“The husband was found dead on the ground, while his wife’s back, hair, and clothes were burned,” Thmey village chief Long Moeurn said.

A 13-year-old boy also died yesterday after being hit by lightning while ploughing a field with his grandfather in Kampot province’s Banteay Meas district, officials said.

The deaths come just days after a powerful rainstorm destroyed 12 houses and damaged more than 40 others, in Takeo’s Samrong district on Monday.

The weather also damaged 20 houses in the province’s Daun Keo town, police said yesterday.

Chhuk Engly, Samrong district deputy police chief, said that the storm hit four villages in Lumchong commune including Khvav, Porng Toeuk, Roung, and Preah Theat.

“The storm damaged 57 houses – 12 were completely destroyed and two people received minor injuries,” he said.

Takeo provincial governor Srey Ben has since brought supplies from the Red Cross to support the 57 families whose houses were badly damaged.

“One family received sarongs, blankets, kramars, tents, mats and 25 kilograms of rice,” Chhuk Engly said, adding that two of the victims received donations of 150,000 riels (around US$37.50) each. “The authorities don’t have plans to build houses for them yet, but can [in the future],” he said, adding that this is the first serious storm to hit Samrong district this year.

Keo Vy, chief deputy director of information and relations for the National Committee for Disaster Management, said yesterday that Cambodia does not yet have the equipment to predict and prevent storms because they largely rely on information from other countries.

“The Ministry of Land Management, Urban Planning and Construction advises people to build their houses with stronger materials so that they can be [protected] from storms,” he said, adding that houses in rural areas are susceptible to damage because they are built with weak materials.

MOST VIEWED

  • US think tank warns of China's 'ulterior motives'

    A US think tank on Tuesday warned that spreading Chinese investment in the Indo-Pacific follows a pattern of leveraging geopolitical influence at the expense of the nations receiving investment, including Cambodia. The report looks at a sample of 15 Chinese port development projects, noting that the

  • More than three tonnes of ivory reportedly bound for Cambodia seized in Mozambique

    A total of 3.5 tonnes of ivory reportedly bound for Cambodia was seized by authorities in Mozambique late last week, according to the NGO Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). CITES' information was based on a report from the

  • Defence Ministry denies weapons in smuggling case came from Cambodia

    After a Thai national was arrested last week for allegedly smuggling guns from Cambodia to Thailand, Cambodia's Defence Ministry has claimed the weapons seized during the arrest are not used in Cambodia, despite the fact that both types of rifle seized are commonly found in

  • Shipwreck found off coast of Koh Kong

    Royal Cambodian Navy researchers are working to identify a decades-old shipwreck found earlier this month off the coast of Koh Kong province. Divers found the 70-metre-long wreck on April 4 about a mile from Koh Chhlam island, according to Navy officials. Deputy Navy Commander Tea Sokha,