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Who is really to blame in WFP scandal

Who is really to blame in WFP scandal

As a final note on the UN World Food Program and its need to collect payment for

food delivered under its Food for Work scheme, let me draw an analogy:

Who is to blame if a water pipe breaks in the desert? Are the people who depend on

the water for survival to blame for wasting water? Are the sands of the desert on

which the water falls to blame for receiving more than their fair share? Or is the

owner of the pipe to blame for allowing the pipe to fall into decay, so that it was

certain to fail?

Perhaps the WFP should look inward when assessing blame. My guess is that Ms Hansen

will be far better suited to her new job, where she will be in an admirable position

to write her own pink slip, than she was in her last one.

Roger W Graham - Phnom Penh.

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