Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - World picking up on Cambodian drop




World picking up on Cambodian drop

World picking up on Cambodian drop

International demand for Cambodian sugar-palm wine continues to boom.

Local producer Confirel can supply only a small fraction of the alcoholic beverage

to a market it estimates is thirsty for 8,000 liters per day.

The bottled version of the traditional Khmer favorite started out as a niche product,

but flavor and sleek packaging have increased its popularity across the world.

"Our major export is to overseas markets, such as France, USA, China and Vietnam,"

said Lyaun Hay, Confirel's managing director. "The local market is very small."

Hay said the company received a license from the Ministry of Commerce in October

2001 but initially kept their launch small because the quality of their product was

unstable.

By 2003, Confirel had managed to control the quality of their bottled palm wine and

began exporting to France. Each half-liter bottle sells for about $5 overseas. The

local price is $2 a bottle.

Last year the company expanded its markets to China, USA and Vietnam, sending seven

containers of Confirel products abroad.

The company has signed contracts with about 300 families in Kampong Speu and Kandal

provinces to supply the sweet, watery sap of the palm tree fruit that is the main

ingredient for their wine.

Chheng Chay, 68, a farmer at Tomnup Sap village in Ang Snuol district of Kandal province,

has been a supplier for the past three years.

Before dawn each morning he begins climbing the trunks of his sugar palms to make

a small cut in the fruit, allowing the nectar to ooze out into a wide plastic pipe.

By seven o'clock, Chay has collected between 30 and 60 liters of palm juice from

his 30 trees, which is then picked up by the company.

"My family's living conditions have become better than before, and I have some

time to do other things," said Chay, who used to boil his palm juice down into

palm sugar to sell at the local market.

Ol Tola, vice general manager of Confirel, said the company has been educating farmers

about sanitary ways to collect and keep the palm juice, adding that company doesn't

buy sour juice.

The dry season is the most productive time for palm tapping, and Comfirel said it

can collect up to 1,000 liters of palm juice a day. In the wet season this falls

to around 300 liters.

To meet the growing market demand, Comfirel is planning on extending its supply network

to Kampong Cham, Kampong Chhnang, Takeo, Prey Veng and Svay Rieng provinces.

Palm wine accounts for more than 60 percent of Confirel's sales. The company also

produces palm sugar, sweet palm juices, natural palm vinegars, palm aperitifs, and

dried fruits cured with palm sugar.

A cognac made from sugar palm nectar will soon be launched.

MOST VIEWED

  • Thousands attend CNRP-organised pro-democracy vigil in South Korea

    Thousands of supporters of the Supreme Court-dissolved Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP) on Saturday gathered in the South Korean city of Gwangju to hold a candlelight demonstration calling for the “liberation” of democracy in Cambodia. Yim Sinorn, a CNRP member in South Korea, said on

  • US Embassy: Chinese trade does not help like the West’s

    The US Embassy in Phnom Penh on Friday said relations between China and Cambodia did not create jobs or help industry when compared to the trade between the Kingdom and the US. “About 87 per cent of trade [with China] are Chinese imports, which do not

  • Vietnamese land-grabbers held

    Following a provincial court order, Ratanakkiri Military Police on April 16 arrested 12 Vietnamese nationals accused of crossing the border into Cambodia and illegally clearing forest land. The accused are now being detained at Phnom Svay prison in the province. Ratanakkiri military police commander Thav Yen told

  • Eight people sent to court over violent protest

    Preah Sihanouk provincial authorities on Sunday sent eight people to court for blocking National Road 4 and using violence against authorities in a land dispute in Prey Nop district’s Bit Traing commune. Four police officers and two commune security guards sustained injuries when the protesters