Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Jotun develops durable anti-fade paint to shield modern buildings

Jotun develops durable anti-fade paint to shield modern buildings

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Tan Robust demand for paints in 2019.

Jotun develops durable anti-fade paint to shield modern buildings

Jotun’s upgraded durable premium quality paint – which can withstand harsh weather conditions, colours do not fade easily and maintain the exterior beauty – can be good news for property owners.

Painting jobs can be messy, labourious and expensive, but the newly formulated Jotashield Antifade Colours could come handy and resolve these nagging problems.

The premium quality Jotashield Antifade Colours, which will be launched today, can last for eight years, compared to the same product launched in 2012 that lasts for six years.

“The Jotashield Antifade has an eight-year colour performance, a 50 percent long lasting (compared to the previous product) and caters for all segments – hotels, houses, and it is good for buildings.

“We have researched and tested the product, and there are no cracks, pealing, fungus or algae. It is relatively improved formulation with better durability for all weathers,” Tan Keng Khoon, Sales and Marketing Manager (Decorative) of Jotun Cambodia Ltd told The Post on Wednesday.

The Norway-based company first introduced Jotashield brand in Southeast Asia more than 25 years ago and in 2012, the product was relaunched with better colour performance. The company managed to sell 50 million litres of the paint – making it the best selling paint by Jotun todate.

The freshly reformulated product has key features – longer lasting colours, superior ultraviolet protection, watermark resistance and temperature control.

Jotun’s relaunching is timely, especially when Cambodia’s construction sector is showing positive signs as the country’s economic growth continues to register a healthy performance with about seven percent growth this year.
Modern skyscrapers and residential properties continue to mushroom in major townships to cater for the growing demand for office space and the population.

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Jotashield has been the best selling paint since its launch 25 years ago. Photo supplied

“Over all there is a good demand due to good economic growth, (rapid) urbanisation, the demographic and population growth. There is growing awareness and people are selective and they want quality products,” said Tan.

A Frost and Sullivan study titled “Independent Market Research on the Paint and Coating Industry in Selected Southeast Asian Countries Final Report May 2017” said the market for decorative paint and coating is flourishing.
The region’s paint and coating industry is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of approximately 7.7 percent between 2016 and 2021, growing from about $1.22 billion in 2016 to nearly $1.77 billion in 2021.

According to the study, Cambodia’s retail market size for decorative paints and coatings was valued at about $24.7 million in 2011 and grew to about $30.0 million in 2016, and by 2021, it is expected to reach $39 million.

“The country’s proximity to Malaysia and Vietnam aiding in raw material imports, the maturity of market and political stability in Cambodia are considered beneficial to the country.

“Additionally, major infrastructure investment focus on areas such as irrigation and water management, rural electrification, roads and water supply are expected to indirectly benefit the retail market for decorative paints and coatings by serving as an impetus to rural household incomes,” said Frost and Sullivan’s report.

After opening its office in Phnom Penh in 2012, Jotun with 75 dealers across the Kingdom aims to strengthen its position as a market leader in the sector, while rivals like Nippon and Dulux are competing for the growing market as well.

“Paint is not just a paint. Paint is most important as it adds image and value to the building. In developing markets, building owners are looking for high quality exterior paints.

“Homeowners can harness the durability of Jotashield to protect their properties from natural weathering and keep their homes beautiful for many years to come. In the long run its costs saving,” said Tan.

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