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Quick, quality burgers a boon to bustling 308

The Supreme has opened along the buzzing strip of Street 308.
The Supreme has opened along the buzzing strip of Street 308. Athena Zelandonii

Quick, quality burgers a boon to bustling 308

Yet another new eatery has popped up along Street 308, this time devoted to the art of the quality fast-food burger. On a row of businesses that sometimes seems to change with the seasons – it fills a hole recently left behind by Bistrot Bassac – The Supreme’s owners wanted something classic, and attention-grabbing.

“We looked at the street and said, “What’s missing?’” says David Do, one of the burger joint’s co-owners and a first-time restaurateur. “There’s one of the best pizza [places] here, there’s French food. What kind of product can compete with the pizza?”

For the French-Cambodian Do and his partners, the answer was easy. “We are five friends who love to eat. We’ve tried many burgers in Phnom Penh, and we were always a bit disappointed,” Do says. So the group turned to Sovan Ly, a pastry chef, to devise his own secret recipe.

Straightforward burgers.
Straightforward burgers. Athena Zelandonii

The result? Burgers made with 30 percent Australian beef and a clandestine mix of seasonings; a handful of specialty house-made sauces; and a sesame-seed bun which – a la Shake Shack – is connected at the back to catch any falling objects.

And The Supreme does in many ways resemble that sort of fast-casual chain: limited in scope, but tailored to a customer who wants a little something extra in his or her on-the-go meal. The surrounds are unassuming; pop music plays as meat sizzles in the background. The burgers arrived at the table within just a few minutes, served on a tray and wrapped up in paper branded with a hand-stamped logo.

They don’t disappoint. Post Weekend sampled the signature Le Supreme Burger ($4.50), which comes with cheddar, pickles and a signature sauce; and Le Gotti ($6.50), with bacon, goat cheese and honey mustard. The patties err on the thin side. While affordable, Le Classic ($3.50) was the only option on the menu with just a single, leaving one reporter feeling a little hungry.

Like any on-the-go eatery, The Supreme has its target set on a cross-section of city-dwellers, but it does hope to entice those who have grown peckish during a night out with its burgers, fries and small selection of beers.

Do sees The Supreme as part of a booming – though small-scale – district for business. He says he knows others interested in expanding the lane. “This street, it could be good as a bit of a pub street,” he says. “There’s a big potential here.”

For now, though, Do is focused on one thing: the burgers. “Did you see the bun?” he laughs.

The Supreme is located at #38 Street 308, in the spot previously occupied by Bistrot Bassac. It is open every day from 11am to 2:30pm and 6pm to 10:30pm. Tel: 077 607 622.

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