Street style at: Aeon

Street style at: Aeon

For our regular street style feature, we go out and ask young Cambodians what fashion means to them and how they choose their look. This week, Vandy Muong and photographer Charlotte Pert head to Aeon Mall

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

HO TYHUY (DAWAT), 19

IT STUDENT AT THE ROYAL UNIVERSITY OF PHNOM PENH
To me, fashion is a way to look cool, and it makes people value you. I love the clothes I’m wearing now – this is my creative look. Sometimes I see Asian people wearing this style, but with a different look. Thai fashion inspires me most, worn with Korean makeup products. Most of the clothes that I buy from the markets in Phnom Penh are imported from Thailand – or else I order from an online shop. I try to add to my style with earrings, tattoos and hair styles. When I go out, I like wearing fancy clothes – casual shirts, long jeans and brand-name shoes with a little makeup and styled hair. I love tattoos – that’s why I have one on my neck that cost $30, and plan to get more done on my hand and back.

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

PRAK NEARDEY, 21

ARCHITECTURE STUDENT AT LIMKOKWING UNIVERSITY
Cambodian fashion is better nowadays, but we still lack creative style – we just wear what looks good. Most of the time I follow styles on the internet – both Asian or Western. I choose clothes that are comfortable and acceptable. Sometimes I like Korean styles – big shirts and long trousers with big glasses, and short skirts with contact lenses. Before, I bought my clothes online, but now I can come to Aeon Mall to buy branded clothes. If Cambodian fashion can be updated, it can match other countries. If we start to carry handbags and other accessories, we can be more stylish.

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

RETH CHAN SOPHEATRA (VID), 16

BUSINESS ENTREPRENEUR STUDENT AT LIMKOKWING UNIVERSITY
I like simple, casual clothes – not too stylish. I wear anything that makes me feel comfortable; I don’t know where it comes from. Sometimes my girlfriend chooses or recommends something for me, and sometimes I order online from eBay. Before, I used to buy trousers or jeans from Limhong shop, and markets around Phnom Penh. In my opinion, fashion means: keep it simple, and be yourself.

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

RIEM MORIKA, 16

ACCOUNTING STUDENT AT VANDA INSTITUTE
I see Cambodian fashion, but I don’t really like it – it doesn’t fit me. I have no idea what fashion is about, I just wear whatever clothes fit my body. That’s why I can’t wear Western styles. I have no time to buy clothes in the market, so I like using online shops like eBay. I just find things that make me feel comfortable. My shirt and shorts only cost about $15.

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