Seeing Angkor by elephant

Seeing Angkor by elephant

templewatch
All aboard for a bumpy ride.

WORKING elephants were used extensively in the construction of the Angkor temples and may have been used to transport stones from the limestone areas around Kulen Mountain. Nowadays elephants transport tourists up Phnom Bakheng hill and from the south gate of Angkor Thom to the Bayon.

It’s a fun way of seeing Angkor, especially for people who have not been on an elephant before. The elephants at Angkor originated from Cambodia. Some came from the Mondulkiri and Ratanakiri regions, where small wild populations still remain. Many of the Angkor animals are becoming quite old, but they are well looked after at a centre, away from public view. Regular veterinary care is carried out by local and Thai vets. I asked a mahout how many bananas do the elephants do to the kilometre? They must have high fuel consumption, as they have huge appetites.
They eat up to 200 kilograms of bananas, sugar cane and vegetables per day. It is no surprise that even a short elephant ride costs $15. But I wonder how their carbon footprint is calculated?

MOST VIEWED

  • Ethnic group ‘disappointed’ to be denied French visas to attend court

    Eleven people at the centre of a case involving seven indigenous Bunong villages in Mondulkiri province pursuing legal action in France have expressed disappointment after the French embassy in Phnom Penh denied their visa applications to attend court. A press release said the 11 included a

  • Cambodia nabs 12th place in best retirement destinations

    Cambodia is an expatriate hotspot for those dreaming of living a more luxurious lifestyle at an affordable cost, according to International Living’s Annual Global Retirement Index 2019. For the fourth year in a row, Cambodia took the top spot in the Cost of Living category.

  • EU starts EBA withdrawal

    The EU on Monday announced that it has begun the 18-month process of withdrawing the Kingdom’s access to its preferential Everything But Arms (EBA) agreement over “a deterioration of democracy [and] respect for human rights”. However, the Garment Manufacturers Association of Cambodia (GMAC) said

  • PM: War result of foreign meddling

    Prime Minister Hun Sen said on Sunday that Cambodia’s recent history of conflict was caused by foreign interference. “The wars that happened were caused by provocation, incitement, support, smearing and interference from foreign powers, and the group of ignorant people who pushed Cambodia to