Supposed letters have affected my honour

Supposed letters have affected my honour

Dear Editor,

I know clearly the political stance of your paper, but I do not understand your aims in tarnishing other journalists’ reputations. Truthfulness, honesty and integrity depend on words or action confirmed by evidence or testimony.

An article in the Post published on January 8, 2015, reports that Chea Sarom – who is embroiled in a land dispute in the capital – showed the Post two letters she claims are from me. The first letter, supposedly dated December 4, claims that I called on the “Ministry of Land Management and Urban Planning to register the land under the names used in the allegedly falsified documents, as well as to Sarom”. The second letter supposedly says: “Please intervene with the Phnom Penh Thmey authorities, [and] Sen Sok district authorities to allow Chea Sarom as representative of 163 families to fill in the land on 9,992 square metres to build houses, and install utilities.”

I, Ho Sethy, have no authority to order the ministry or Phnom Penh authorities to do the job.

The prime minister’s cabinet only has authority to issue letters to institutions concerned for review or if necessary, raise the idea to the premier to review and approve.

I would like you to produce the evidence that would confirm I have behaved in a manner suggested.

I expect you will keep some integrity and produce the letters I have been accused of writing. The supposed letters have led to a misunderstanding and have affected my honour. I believe you will have courage to publish my letter in your paper.

PS: I would like to send my letter to HE senior minister of land management to review and raise the principles of Samdech Prime Minister to review.

Ho Sethy
Chief of Prime Minister Hun Sen’s Cabinet

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