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Where to go to equip yourself for a new arrival

Where to go to equip yourself for a new arrival

The best places to acquire some baby transport, a place for the little one to sleep, and all the other bits and bobs that go with new parenthood

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Strollers
Perhaps the true test of responsible parenthood comes on the day you accept that shopping for some hot new wheels more likely means a trip to a baby shop than to a car showroom. If that moment is upon you, then head to Farlin, which has dedicated considerable floor space to showcasing its range of high quality strollers – both own brand and imported. Strollers start at $88, with more expensive models offering multiple foot and backrest settings. Their top of the range pick, the BF-890S, is a sleek and streamlined three-wheeler – perfect for negotiating Phnom Penh’s packed pavements. Farlin are opening their own “mall” later this year, which will include a baby care centre, a move that should allow parents to snatch back some precious alone time while browsing.  
Farlin, #175A, Mao Tse Toung Blvd. Tel: 023 228 555

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Cribs
Babies spend more time in their crib than anywhere else in the home, so comfort and safety are key attributes when looking to make the investment – make sure the crib doesn’t wobble or rattle, and that the slats are no wider than the baby’s head so that it doesn’t slip through or get stuck. Things to look out for are features such as change tables, storage drawers and whether it can be converted into a toddler’s bed as the child grows. A few dangling toys to play with are a bonus, but avoid unnecessary decorations that might be a choking hazard. Baby and Me Baby Shop on Sihanouk Boulevard has a selection of cribs with and without canopies, and for a
variety of budgets, with prices ranging from $175 up to $300.
Baby And Me Baby Shop, #171 Street 63 (corner of Sihanouk Boulevard) Tel: 016 755 866.

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Supplies
Mommies-to-be stocking up on supplies can minimise their waddle time by getting it all done at once at one-stop shop Baby Care, which has three branches in the city: Street 51, Street 271 and Street 289. The stores are set up for bulk buying: they sell family-sized packets of nappies, wipes and formula milk, as well as bedding, clothes, cribs, baby bottles and more. Leaving no base uncovered, they also have a range of kids’ clothing. Faintly fun fact: one of the managers is called Mom.
Baby Care, #86 Street 51, tel: 089 707 707; #89A Street 271, tel: 012 84 9970; and #34 Street 289, tel: 016 558 168.

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Baby accessories
While mainly stocking clothes for babies, toddlers and small children up to 10 years old (priced from $1 to about $15), Pitchoun also has you covered for all your baby accessory needs, from colourful cloth bibs ($6) and cute puppy-themed rattles ($7.90), to pretty scrunchies and headbands ($1-$2.50). The stock is both imported and locally made. The shop has a children’s play corner so parents can concentrate on shopping. Bonus tip: “Pitchoun” is a French word expressing affection in regards to a child.
Pitchoun, #25DEoE1, Street 294 (corner of Street 21). Tel: 017 555 325.

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Maternity fashion
Among the stars, it’s en vogue to ditch maternity wear in favour of off-script fashion: a very pregnant Kerry Washington appeared at the Screen Actors Guild last year in a crop top. But for most ordinary mortals, finding a decent Empire-line dress or loose-fitting trousers is taxing enough without bringing a midriff into it. Phnom Penh has some inexpensive options – many in Mother’s Boutique Cambodia. If you’d rather skip ruching, they have pretty long-length blouses that can be worn with leggings. Plus you can pre-order shoes and bags from slick Singaporean brand Charles and Keith.
Mother’s Boutique Cambodia, #110 Monivong Boulevard. Tel: 012 211 8 98.

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