Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Cambodia low on energy ranking

Cambodia low on energy ranking

Cambodia low on energy ranking

Low electrification rates and over-dependence on fossil fuel imports have contributed to Cambodia’s abysmally low ranking in the new World Economic Forum’s Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report for 2014.

Cambodia ranked 120 out of 124 nations, with a so-called Energy Architecture Performance Index (EAPI) score of 0.36. EAPI is calculated by averaging the country’s scores in economic growth and development, environmental sustainability, access to energy and energy security. Discounting Myanmar and Laos, which weren’t included in the index due to lack of data, Cambodia came in dead last among the remaining members of Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean).

“The [Asean] region’s lowest-performing country across energy access-related indicators is Cambodia. It achieves the lowest access to electricity relative to population (at 31 per cent), and nearly 90 per cent using solid cooking fuels,” the report said.

Cambodia placed ahead of only Tanzania, Benin, Lebanon and Yemen. Norway was in the top slot of all the 124 countries with an EAPI of 0.75. The highest possible obtainable score is 1.

Srey Chanty, president of the Cambodian Economic Association, cited a lack of diversification in the energy sector as the reason for the low rank.

“If Cambodia wants to become more competitive, especially in the manufacturing industry, we must have our own source of energy, increase government investment into energy-saving technologies and reduce reliance on our [Asean] neighbours, who, themselves, are developing countries,” he said. “This is not an issue we can pass on to the next generation.”

Cambodia imports oil from Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam, and in the first 10 months of this year spent $1.2 billion on oil imports, data from the Ministry of Commerce show.

In May, the government released a draft policy on energy efficiency developed with the European Union’s Energy Initiative Partnership Dialogue Facility that calls for a 20 per cent reduction in consumption by 2035, resulting in estimated savings of $320 million.

MOST VIEWED

  • PM slams HRW ‘double standards’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has chided Human Rights Watch (HRW) Asia director Brad Adams for keeping quiet over protest crackdowns in the US following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25. Addressing reporters while inspecting infrastructure development in Preah Sihanouk province on Monday,

  • Bank robber of $6M asks to be released

    An accused bank robber who admitted to stealing $6 million has asked the Supreme Court to release him temporarily because he had returned the money. In a court hearing on Tuesday Chan Simuntha, 39, told the judge that on January 18, his wife Teang Vathanaknearyroth told him that

  • WHO: Antibiotics cause more deaths

    Increased antibiotics use in combating the Covid-19 pandemic will strengthen bacterial resistance and ultimately lead to more deaths during the crisis and beyond, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Monday. WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said a “worrying number” of bacterial infections were becoming

  • Children in poverty said to rise by 86M

    The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and Save the Children warned that if urgent measures are not taken, the number of children living in poverty across low- and middle-income countries could increase by 86 million, a 15 per cent jump, by the end of the year. In

  • Four more Cambodian peacekeepers get Covid-19 in Mali

    Four more Cambodian Blue Helmet peacekeepers in Mali have been diagnosed with the novel coronavirus, bringing the number of infected Cambodian UN peacekeepers to 10. National Centre for Peacekeeping Forces and Explosive Remnants of War deputy director-general and spokeswoman Kosal Malinda told The Post on Tuesday

  • Huge tracks of undocumented land a concern for registration officials

    Siem Reap provincial deputy governor Ly Samrith expressed concern that land registration plans for residents scheduled to be completed by late 2021 could not be achieved because 80 per cent of the land had not been registered. Land dispute issues are a major factor that poses a