Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Illegal Sihanoukville construction on radar

Illegal Sihanoukville construction on radar

Prime Minister Hun Sen visits the beach in Sihanoukville during his vacation in December. Facebook
Prime Minister Hun Sen visits the beach in Sihanoukville during his vacation in December. Facebook

Illegal Sihanoukville construction on radar

Tourism and other line ministries will raise the issue of unlawful construction along Sihanoukville’s coastline at a meeting scheduled for today, given the presence of illegal buildings along the coastal city’s beaches.

The meeting, which will be held at the Tourism Ministry, will have participants debating concrete solutions to the long-standing problem, according Yun Min, governor of Preah Sihanouk province.

“Honestly, there are many illegal buildings that are big and built a long time ago, which makes it difficult to solve,” he said.

Min said the meeting will consider whether to give these illegal sites more time to demolish their buildings or if the local authorities will do it.

Prime Minister Hun Sen in a Facebook post yesterday, talking about his vacation to Sihanoukville last month, suggested that authorities not allow any kind of illegal construction along the beaches to maintain their natural beauty.

Tith Chantha, a spokesperson for the Tourism Ministry, said that while this was not a new issue, the relevant authorities would study and take action on the matter, in response to the prime minister’s call.

“Construction that invades onto public spaces is considered as breaking the law. So, the relevant authorities must study and take action on this,” he said.

He added that given Cambodia’s membership of the World’s Most Beautiful Beach Club, it was imperative to manage the issue and retain the area’s environmental sanctity.

Opposition lawmaker Son Chhay said strong action was needed from the prime minister to resolve the problem.

“Just talking or making threats to those who invade public property will not scare them,” Chhay said.

Chhay said it was also critical to find out who allowed these constructions to go ahead.

MOST VIEWED

  • Research key to Kanitha’s rep for expertise

    Sok Kanitha is used to weighing in on controversial issues using a confident approach that signals expertise and authority, and a recent video she made was no exception. Her “Episode 342: The History of NATO” video went live on January 16, 2023 and immediately shot to 30,000 likes and 3,500

  • Cambodia maintains 'Kun Khmer' stance despite Thailand’s boycott threat

    Cambodia has taken the position that it will use the term "Kun Khmer" to refer to the sport of kickboxing at the upcoming Southeast Asian (SEA) Games, and has removed the term Muay from all references to the sport. Despite strong reactions from the Thai

  • Knockout! Kun Khmer replaces ‘Muay’ for Phnom Penh Games

    Cambodia has decided to officially remove the word Muay from the programme of the 32nd Southeast Asian (SEA) Games 2023 in May. “Kun Khmer” will instead be used to represent the Southeast Asian sport of kickboxing, in accordance with the wishes of the Cambodian people. Vath

  • Artificial insemination takes herd from 7 to 700

    Some farms breed local cows or even import bulls from a broad for the purpose of breeding heavier livestock for meat production. One Tbong Khnum farmer has found a more efficient way. Hout Leang employs artificial insemination to fertilise local cows. Thanks to imported “straws”

  • Chinese group tours return to Cambodia starting Feb 6

    Cambodia is among 20 countries selected by Beijing for a pilot programme allowing travel agencies to provide international group tours as well as flight and hotel packages to Chinese citizens, following a three-year ban. As the days tick down until the programme kicks off on February 6,

  • Capital-Poipet express rail project making headway

    The preliminary results of a feasibility study to upgrade the Phnom Penh-Poipet railway into Cambodia’s first express railway indicate that the project would cost more than $4 billion and would take around four years to complete. The study was carried out by China Road and