Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Study: Ride-hailing firms get most funding in SEA internet economy

Study: Ride-hailing firms get most funding in SEA internet economy

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Cambodia ride-hailing app ExNet shows a passenger’s position near Independence Monument in Phnom Penh’s Boeung Keng Kang I commune. POST PIX

Study: Ride-hailing firms get most funding in SEA internet economy

Ride-hailing companies have taken home the lion’s share of investor dollars in Southeast Asia’s internet economy, amid intense competition among tech firms to become the region’s first “super app”.

Almost 70 per cent of funding went to companies in ride-hailing and e-commerce from 2016 to the first half of this year, according to a joint study by Google, Temasek and Bain & Company.

The study released on Thursday noted that Southeast Asia has remained a bright spot with funding flows growing at a “healthy pace”, even as global venture funding dropped 17.5 per cent in the second quarter of this year from a year ago amid slowing economic growth and a cloudy outlook.

Ride-hailing firms took home the largest sum of around $14 billion, with its two leading players Grab and Go-Jek staging mega financing rounds to build up food delivery and financial services, said the report. It added that both have also acquired new ventures and started acting as investors in the ecosystem.

E-commerce has attracted $9.9 billion worth of investments since 2016, and is on track to meet the record $4.3 billion raised last year.

Funding to other sectors such as online media, however, has slowed.

The bulk of funding has continued to flow to the biggest tech firms in the region, with unicorns in the region attracting $24 billion out of the total $37 billion raised. These refer to start-ups valued at more than $1 billion.

Nearly 70 “aspiring unicorns” – companies valued at between $100 million and $1 billion – have raised more than $5 billion since 2016 as well.

But more late-stage funding is needed for them to scale up, the study found.

Companies in this category include cashback platform ShopBack, logistics provider Ninja Van and financial products marketplace GoBear.

For ‘aspiring unicorns’ to graduate, Southeast Asia needs more late-stage financing through investments that range from $25 million to $100 million and above, the report added.

To attract such investments, the companies need to prove that they can rapidly grow their business either by successfully entering new markets, expanding to other sectors or securing exceptional levels of user engagement and loyalty.

They will also have to show that they can monetise their services.

While venture capital investors are raising larger growth funds to back their most successful investees for longer periods, institutional investors are becoming more willing to enter earlier stages of fund-raising.

The support for start-ups “signals the strong potential the region holds for investors in the long term”, said the report.

Meanwhile, the average deal size in early-stage funding doubled in the past three years, from about $2 million in 2016 for Series A funding to $4 million this year.

Singapore remains the gateway for regional funding and is on track this year to match the record deals and funds raised last year, it added.

There was $5.3 billion raised in 297 deals in the city-state in the first six months of this year, including multi-billion dollar financing rounds by ride-hailing firm Grab and New York-listed e-commerce operator Sea Group.

Elsewhere, funding in Indonesia is on track to break its 2018 record, while the e-commerce sector powers Vietnam’s Internet boom.

The large travel sector and fast-growing online media are “bright spots” in Thailand but its ventures have been facing challenges in raising late-stage funding to scale up the businesses.

THE STRAITS TIMES (SINGAPORE)

MOST VIEWED

  • First Khmer woman to pass out of West Point

    The life of a soldier certainly isn’t for everyone. The training is gruelling, the hours long and there’s no room for excuses. On top of that, soldiers must be ready to respond to sudden threats at a moment’s notice. Just ask Sithyka

  • Tourists urged not to skip trip

    The Ministry of Tourism has called on international tourists not to cancel trips to Cambodia, but urged them to adhere to several dos and don’ts when arriving in the Kingdom during the Covid-19 pandemic. The ministry released an eight-point instruction manual on Wednesday published

  • The taxman cometh – Cambodia’s capital gains tax casts the net on individual taxpayers

    In a country where only limited personal income tax existed, the new taxation law beginning January 1, 2021, will make taxpayers out of Cambodians, whether they are ready for it or not About two years ago, a little known amendment was made to Article 7 of the Law

  • Cambodian-American gets Star Trek treatment

    Kevin Ung, a Cambodian-American whose family escaped genocide during the Khmer Rouge’s reign of terror, was recently selected from thousands of applicants to participate in the Television Academy Foundation’s inaugural 2020 Star Trek Command Training Programme, a course intended to give hands-on filmmaking experience

  • Cambodia seeks to be transport hub

    Cambodia is working on several fronts to modernise its transport infrastructure and services, concentrating on opening new international gates to relieve and balance traffic congestion at its borders, Minister of Public Works and Transport Sun Chanthol said on Thursday. This is part of the Kingdom’

  • Deminers unearth ancient lion statue

    Cambodia Mine Action Centre (CMAC) director-general Heng Ratana told The Post on Tuesday that a statue of a lion was found by mine clearance experts while they were digging for a development project. It was sent to the Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts last