Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - US sends first soybean shipment to Cambodia

US sends first soybean shipment to Cambodia

Combines harvest soybeans in a field at farm near Pleasantville, Iowa, on October 14, 2015. Ryan Donnell/The New York Times
Combines harvest soybeans in a field at farm near Pleasantville, Iowa, on October 14, 2015. Ryan Donnell/The New York Times

US sends first soybean shipment to Cambodia

The US sent its first shipment of food-grade soybeans to Cambodia last week, exporting a total of 14 tonnes to both Cambodia and Myanmar to be processed in the receiving countries, according to US media reports.

The shipments were sent to soy milk and tofu companies in the Kingdom, potentially opening up a long-term relationship between the US and Cambodian-based soy companies, according to a report from US-based American Ag Radio Network.

Hean Vanhan, director general at the Agriculture Ministry’s General Directorate, said he was unaware of the shipment and did not know which Cambodia-based processing companies were receiving the beans, but added the move as a positive one for the country’s economy.

“Our economy will likely benefit from this,” Vanhan said. “The best way is to use the raw materials produced in the country, but if the cost of production is higher for local produce, then it is better to import.”
Local soybean producers have been suffering due to high processing costs and low profitability for several years now, according to farmer Loeng Kim Sean, who once headed the Tah Ong Soybean Development Association in Kampong Cham province.

The association was dissolved a year ago, Kim Sean said yesterday, as he and other farmers switched from soybeans to produce more profitable crops, such as cashews or cassava.
“Farmers gave up farming soybeans because the prices are too low for them to make a profit,” he said, adding that there were no remaining soybean farmers in the province.

“I could not give a better price to the farmer due to a lot of competition in the market from soybean imports…so we are better off looking for other potential crops instead.”

MOST VIEWED

  • PM slams HRW ‘double standards’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has chided Human Rights Watch (HRW) Asia director Brad Adams for keeping quiet over protest crackdowns in the US following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25. Addressing reporters while inspecting infrastructure development in Preah Sihanouk province on Monday,

  • Bank robber of $6M asks to be released

    An accused bank robber who admitted to stealing $6 million has asked the Supreme Court to release him temporarily because he had returned the money. In a court hearing on Tuesday Chan Simuntha, 39, told the judge that on January 18, his wife Teang Vathanaknearyroth told him that

  • WHO: Antibiotics cause more deaths

    Increased antibiotics use in combating the Covid-19 pandemic will strengthen bacterial resistance and ultimately lead to more deaths during the crisis and beyond, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Monday. WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said a “worrying number” of bacterial infections were becoming

  • Children in poverty said to rise by 86M

    The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and Save the Children warned that if urgent measures are not taken, the number of children living in poverty across low- and middle-income countries could increase by 86 million, a 15 per cent jump, by the end of the year. In

  • Four more Cambodian peacekeepers get Covid-19 in Mali

    Four more Cambodian Blue Helmet peacekeepers in Mali have been diagnosed with the novel coronavirus, bringing the number of infected Cambodian UN peacekeepers to 10. National Centre for Peacekeeping Forces and Explosive Remnants of War deputy director-general and spokeswoman Kosal Malinda told The Post on Tuesday

  • Huge tracks of undocumented land a concern for registration officials

    Siem Reap provincial deputy governor Ly Samrith expressed concern that land registration plans for residents scheduled to be completed by late 2021 could not be achieved because 80 per cent of the land had not been registered. Land dispute issues are a major factor that poses a