A new player enters Phnom Penh’s food delivery market

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
After ordering food through the app, customers will receive an arrival time for their food, while they can also track the exact location of their driver through the app’s inbuilt map. Sreng Meng Srun

A new player enters Phnom Penh’s food delivery market

Seeing the growing number of office workers and smartphone users in Phnom Penh, two young entrepreneurs have entered the competitive world of mobile phone apps and launched their own food ordering service, Muuve Delivery.

Launched three months ago, Muuve Delivery is entering an already competitive marketplace for food delivery, with the likes of Meal Temple and NHAM24 cornering large segments of the market.

But the app’s co-founder Panh Phanith told The Post that he hopes to set Muuve Delivery apart from the competition by placing a strong ethos of customer convenience at the heart of the application.

“Our app doesn’t require customers to make calls to a delivery company; users can order food by just opening the app on their smartphone, choosing a restaurant and their food, and then clicking order. In addition, customers can set their location with menu in the app and it will automatically identify your location to the carrier,” the 25-year-old said.

Phanith added that after ordering, customers will receive an arrival time for their food, while they can also track the exact location of their driver through the app’s inbuilt map.

Among the burgeoning app’s happy users is 23-year-old Ou Dom, a worker for travel company World Friend Tours in the capital.

“The first thing that I like about Muuve is that it helps me to think of what I want to eat as it has so many menus. Secondly, it saves time so I don’t have to leave my desk or waste time going to get food. Thirdly, I can order food for myself and get it delivered anywhere, even to my friend or girlfriend,” he said.

The app’s cofounder Nik said he and Phanith were confident the app would be a hit, adding that they hoped that in addition to providing a good food delivery service, they will be able to provide low income people and students with an extra source of income.

“This programme is designed to help students who are looking for a job. Moto drivers or tuk-tuk drivers can also earn some money with a part-time job, selecting jobs when they are free and able to deliver the food. If they became our members, we will give bonus to them,” he said.

MOST VIEWED

  • Thousands attend CNRP-organised pro-democracy vigil in South Korea

    Thousands of supporters of the Supreme Court-dissolved Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP) on Saturday gathered in the South Korean city of Gwangju to hold a candlelight demonstration calling for the “liberation” of democracy in Cambodia. Yim Sinorn, a CNRP member in South Korea, said on

  • Cambodia-Thailand rail reconnected after 45 years

    A railway reconnecting Cambodia and Thailand was officially inaugurated on Monday following a 45-year hiatus, with the two kingdoms’ prime ministers in attendance at the ceremony. On the occasion, Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen and Thai Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha travelled together from Thailand’s

  • US Embassy: Chinese trade does not help like the West’s

    The US Embassy in Phnom Penh on Friday said relations between China and Cambodia did not create jobs or help industry when compared to the trade between the Kingdom and the US. “About 87 per cent of trade [with China] are Chinese imports, which do not

  • Vietnamese land-grabbers held

    Following a provincial court order, Ratanakkiri Military Police on April 16 arrested 12 Vietnamese nationals accused of crossing the border into Cambodia and illegally clearing forest land. The accused are now being detained at Phnom Svay prison in the province. Ratanakkiri military police commander Thav Yen told