Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - The Singaporean ride-hailing app challenging the industry’s big boys



The Singaporean ride-hailing app challenging the industry’s big boys

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Tada does not charge drivers commission and is hoping to challenge the ride sharing dominance commanded by the industry’s two big names in the Kingdom, Pass App and Grab. Hong Menea

The Singaporean ride-hailing app challenging the industry’s big boys

Cambodia is set to become the second destination for Singapore’s up and coming ride-hailing service aiming to unseat the region’s main contenders Pass App and Grab through its cheaper fares and novel business model.

Tada – which in Korean means ‘to ride’ – is the first ride-hailing service to take zero-commission from its drivers, and has already attracted more than 200 drivers in the Kingdom since it went live in mid-January this year.

It was first launched in Singapore in July last year, where it has more than 27,000 drivers and 200,000 users registered. Following its successful roll-out in Singapore and Cambodia, Tada will also be launched in Vietnam and Malaysia in the coming months.

Founder and CEO Kay Woo said that central to Tada’s business philosophy is creating deep and meaningful relationships with its driver-partners, adding that he wants his drivers to feel less stress about their income and paying commission.

“We are now open to all drivers in Phnom Penh. We are committed to bring an improvement to drivers’ earnings in Cambodia through Tada’s zero commission platform.

“Drivers no longer have to worry about paying high commission to the platform company. We want drivers to enjoy driving without stress and be able to offer a good service to riders. The Tada team will actively listen to the needs of both the drivers and riders and improve the situation together with our community,” says Woo.

Also setting it apart from its competitors is Tada’s incentive-based blockchain mobility ecosystem, powered by its parent company Mass Vehicle Ledger (MVL). The technology brings together key mobility data such as transactions, movement, accidents and the maintenance of vehicles into a single MVL ecosystem.

The app’s marketing manager Shanel Tan said the lack of driver commission would drive down prices for customers.

“We do not earn directly from the drivers and our drivers no longer have to worry about paying high commission to the platform company. We want drivers to enjoy driving without stress and offer good services to riders,” he said. “And as we do not charge commission, there is room for lower fare prices for riders as well.”

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Through not charging commission, Tada aims to provide cheaper fares than their rivals. Hong Menea

Tan added that while Tada currently only has standard taxi options they are already in the process of recruiting tuk tuk drivers.

“For now, we only have the standard taxi option. but we are on-boarding tuk tuk drivers for registration now. Our tuk tuk service will be launching soon,” he said.

With its financial incentives, many of the capital’s drivers are already hailing the benefits of Tada’s new system.

“Tada is different from other companies’ service because they do not charge commission from drivers. It is very good,” said 42-year-old Kol Sophea, a driver of metered taxis for 11 years in Phnom Penh.

He added that though he has reservations about working with a newly established company, he strongly believes that it has the potential to be a success if it can attract high quality drivers to help promote the service.

Tada’s operations manager Radeth Din, speaking to The Post, provided a real life example of the kind of savings customers could expect.

“From here [the Phnom Penh Centre] to the Royal Palace, Grab charges you 8,500 riel [$2.12], of which the driver can get about 6,000 riel."

“For Tada’s service, at the same distance, the rider pays 8,000 riel and the driver gets the full amount,” he said, adding that the app regularly has discount promotions.

MOST VIEWED

  • Hong Kong firm done buying Coke Cambodia

    Swire Coca-Cola Ltd, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Hong Kong-listed Swire Pacific Ltd, on November 25 announced that it had completed the acquisition of The Coca-Cola Co’s bottling business in Cambodia, as part of its ambitions to expand into the Southeast Asian market. Swire Coca-Cola affirmed

  • Cambodia's Bokator now officially in World Heritage List

    UNESCO has officially inscribed Cambodia’s “Kun Lbokator”, commonly known as Bokator, on the World Heritage List, according to Minister of Culture and Fine Arts Phoeurng Sackona in her brief report to Prime Minister Hun Sen on the night of November 29. Her report, which was

  • NagaWorld union leader arrested at airport after Australia trip

    Chhim Sithar, head of the Labour Rights Supported Union of Khmer Employees at NagaWorld integrated casino resort, was arrested on November 26 at Phnom Penh International Airport and placed in pre-trial detention after returning from a 12-day trip to Australia. Phnom Penh Municipal Court Investigating Judge

  • Sub-Decree approves $30M for mine clearance

    The Cambodian government established the ‘Mine-Free Cambodia 2025 Foundation’, and released an initial budget of $30 million. Based on the progress of the foundation in 2023, 2024 and 2025, more funds will be added from the national budget and other sources. In a sub-decree signed by Prime Minister Hun Sen

  • Two senior GDP officials defect to CPP

    Two senior officials of the Grassroots Democratic Party (GDP) have asked to join the Cambodian People’s Party (CPP), after apparently failing to forge a political alliance in the run-up to the 2023 general election. Yang Saing Koma, chairman of the GDP board, and Lek Sothear,

  • Cambodia's poverty cut in half from 2009 to 2019: World Bank report

    A report published by the World Bank on November 28 states that Cambodia’s national poverty rate fell by almost half between 2009 and 2019, but the Covid-19 pandemic recently reversed some of the poverty reduction progress. Cambodia’s poverty rate dropped from 33.8 to 17.8 per cent over the 10