Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - European leaders agree to delay Brexit by six months

European leaders agree to delay Brexit by six months

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
British Prime Minister Theresa May leaves a meeting on Brexit at the Europa Building in Brussels on Thursday. KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP

European leaders agree to delay Brexit by six months

EUROPEAN leaders agreed with Britain on Thursday to delay Brexit by up to six months, saving the continent from what could have been a chaotic no-deal departure at the end of the week.

The deal struck during late night talks in Brussels means that, if London remains in the EU after May 22, British voters will have to take part in European elections – or crash out on June 1.

Prime Minister Theresa May said she would now keep working to get her withdrawal agreement approved by parliament to ensure an orderly split, saying her goal was to leave “as soon as possible”.

The other 27 EU leaders met without May over dinner to thrash out what European Council president Donald Tusk called “a flexible extension until 31 October”.

May later returned to agree the new deadline, which British newspapers were quick to note falls on Halloween.

She was to address the House of Commons on Thursday before her officials meet for further talks with the main opposition Labour party to try to find a way through the political deadlock.

Without a postponement, Britain would have ended its 46-year membership of the EU at midnight (2200 GMT) on Friday with no deal, risking economic chaos on both sides of the Channel.

Tusk had proposed a year-long delay, but said: “It’s still enough to find the best possible solution. Please do not waste this time.”

He suggested May’s government now had time to ratify the deal agreed with EU leaders in November, to rethink its approach or to stop the entire Brexit process.

The summit conclusions say Britain must hold European elections set for May 23 or if “the United Kingdom fails to live up to this obligation, the withdrawal will take place on 1 June 2019”.

Britain has already started planning for the polls, but May told reporters that she hoped she could still get her deal agreed by May 22 and avoid taking part.

“The EU have agreed that the extension can be terminated when the Withdrawal Agreement has been ratified,” she said.

French opposition

The summit was more tense than expected, with French President Emmanuel Macron the strongest voice opposing a long extension as the talks stretched from early evening to early Thursday morning.

With backing from Belgium, Austria and some smaller EU states, he pushed to limit the delay to only few weeks and demanded guarantees that London would not interfere in EU business during that time.

But most leaders backed the longer plan, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and the French had to settle a review of the delay at a pre-planned EU summit on June 20 and 21.

Macron said afterwards this was the “best possible compromise”, which “made it possible to preserve the unity” of the other 27 EU states.

“The October 31 deadline protects us” because it is “a key date, before the installation of a new European Commission”, he said.

May left the group after giving what one official said was a “solid” presentation of her case, but was kept up to date by Tusk, who met her before, during and after the discussions.

Addressing MPs back home, who have rejected her withdrawal text three times, May said after the summit: “The choices we now face are stark and the timetable is clear.

“So we must now press on at pace with our efforts to reach a consensus on a deal that is in the national interest.”

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn wants Britain to commit to remaining within the EU customs union, an idea that May has previously rejected – but which many in Europe would be keen to accommodate.

There had been speculation about conditions imposed on any extension, amid concerns a semi-detached Britain might leverage in Brexit talks by intervening in choosing the next head of the European Commission or the next multi-year EU budget.

The summit conclusions make clear Britain was a full member of the EU until it left, but noted the “commitment by the UK to act in a constructive and responsible manner throughout the extension”.

MOST VIEWED

  • Cambodia-Thailand rail reconnected after 45 years

    A railway reconnecting Cambodia and Thailand was officially inaugurated on Monday following a 45-year hiatus, with the two kingdoms’ prime ministers in attendance at the ceremony. On the occasion, Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen and Thai Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha travelled together from Thailand’s

  • Thousands attend CNRP-organised pro-democracy vigil in South Korea

    Thousands of supporters of the Supreme Court-dissolved Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP) on Saturday gathered in the South Korean city of Gwangju to hold a candlelight demonstration calling for the “liberation” of democracy in Cambodia. Yim Sinorn, a CNRP member in South Korea, said on

  • US Embassy: Chinese trade does not help like the West’s

    The US Embassy in Phnom Penh on Friday said relations between China and Cambodia did not create jobs or help industry when compared to the trade between the Kingdom and the US. “About 87 per cent of trade [with China] are Chinese imports, which do not

  • The Christian NGO empowering Cambodian families in Siem Reap

    With its basketball court, football pitch, tennis court and ninja warrior water sports area, you could be forgiven for thinking that the Siem Reap campus of International Christian Fellowship (ICF) Cambodia is a sports centre. But while these free, family-friendly activities are one of the