Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Kremlin critic in jail, 1,400 detained



Kremlin critic in jail, 1,400 detained

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Alexei Navalny. HANDOUT / MOSCOW CITY COURT PRESS SERVICE / AFP

Kremlin critic in jail, 1,400 detained

More than 1,400 protesters were detained by Russian authorities during rallies supporting Alexei Navalny, a civil monitoring group said on February 3, after the Kremlin’s most prominent critic was jailed for nearly three years amid international condemnation.

Judge Natalya Repnikova on February 2 ordered a 2014 suspended three-and-a-half-year sentence that the 44-year-old anti-corruption campaigner – who accuses Moscow of poisoning him last year – received on fraud charges to be changed to time in a penal colony, an AFP journalist at the courthouse said.

Navalny was accused of violating parole conditions by refusing to check in with prison officials and was arrested when he flew back to Moscow on January 17 from Germany, where he spent months recovering from a poisoning.

He said it was impossible to make the appointments while abroad, but the judge said he had skipped meetings prior to the poisoning.

Navalny had spent time under house arrest after the 2014 conviction – which was denounced by the European Court of Human Rights – and Repnikova said that would count as time served.

His lawyer Olga Mikhailova said he would now serve around two years and eight months in prison.

His legal team plan to appeal, she added, with Navalny expected to stay in detention in Moscow during that process.

Britain, France, Germany, the US and the EU denounced the ruling and called for his immediate release, as Moscow accused the West of interfering in its affairs.

By early on February 3, 1,408 people had been detained across Russian cities – mostly in Moscow and St Petersburg – the civil monitoring group OVD-Info said. Many were detained before Navalny’s sentence.

Navalny’s supporters had earlier called for more demonstrations against the decision after thousands joined nationwide protests against his arrest over the last two weekends.

MOST VIEWED

  • With herd immunity likely in 2022, is Cambodia ready to reopen for tourism?

    The government aims to inoculate 80 per cent of the target population by June next year, giving it a head start among regional peers to reboot the sector but first, it has to do a few things to up its game A sign on a glass

  • US wants 'full access' to Ream Naval Base

    On June 11, the US embassy's Defense Attaché Colonel Marcus M Ferrara visited Ream Nava Base in coordination with Cambodian officials following the recent approval of Prime minister Hun Sen to allay the concerns on Chinese military presence at the base as raised by US Deputy

  • Jab drive heading to 5 provinces

    The government is set to vaccinate more than 1.2 million people in five provinces after finishing with Phnom Penh and neighbouring Kandal in an ongoing campaign administered by the ministries of Health and National Defence. The five provinces are Preah Sihanouk, Kampong Speu, Takeo, Kampong Cham

  • New immigration bill targets illegal foreigners in Kingdom

    General Department of Immigration (GDI) officials are discussing revisions to the new draft law on immigration to prevent foreigners from entering Cambodia illegally and to supervise those living in the Kingdom more effectively. The revisions draw wide support among civil society organisations. GDI director-general Kirth

  • Kingdom set to be a gold producer

    Cambodia will soon join the roster of gold producing countries after the government announced the commencement of commercial gold mining operations in the Okvau area in southwestern Mondulkiri province's Keo Seima district from June 21. Prime Minister Hun Sen on June 10 announced that after 14 years of

  • School reopening can’t wait

    With the Covid-19 pandemic now well into its second year, safely reopening schools has become an urgent priority. School attendance is critical for children’s education and lifetime prospects. The long-term costs of closures – both for individual children and society – are simply too large to