A day in the life of an event decoration controller

A day in the life of an event decoration controller

BEING an event decorations controller is a job that has its peaks and lulls.

“It’s not busy all the time, but it is quite tough sometimes,” Long Moldary says.

Dary, 24, has worked for about a year with the Sopheak Mangkol wedding service, which specialises in providing event preparations, especially for wedding ceremonies.

“The wedding season is our busiest time. It mostly runs from October to late February, ” Dary says. “Although the company has been in operation  for only about two years, it has developed its service rapidly.”

Dary shows the decoration model to her customers, and together they select the décor, including the scene, model, colour and so on.

She explains that it’s her task to manage the décor, which is made by the decorator. She normally works on the style of the stage, where the date and the names of the newlywed couple are displayed.

Dary has, in fact, just graduated from the Human Resource University with a major in finance and banking. But her day job is suited to her interests, and she works non-stop without ever feeling fatigued.

“Working in this job is my favour-ite activity. I love it, and I never feel tired from doing it,” Dary says.

“It’s a pleasure and a great honour to have the chance to provide every single aspect of an event for my customers.”

I spoke to Dary early in the week. It was a free day for her and there was no event booked, so I was able to talk with her for some time. Even so, a few customers dropped in.

This company has found a useful niche in the market by assuming some of the responsibility for organising weddings, allowing the happy couple to relax and participate fully in other aspects of the ceremony.

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