A day in the life of phone programme installer

A day in the life of phone programme installer

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“If your phone shuts down automatically, I’ll have to install a new programme.  Otherwise, your phone won’t work any more and you’ll need to go to the phone repair shop.”  These are words commonly heard coming from phone-programme installer Seng Sopeak.  Seng Sopeak sits in a row of six others, monitoring a phone programme installation program on his laptop.  A stack of mobile phones sits next to each of the technicians, all waiting to have new programmes installed.

Seng Sopeak has spent the past two months working as a programme installer at Khlang Msay market, the premier source for mobile phones of all prices, as well as repair and program installation services.  

In front of his desk, I saw a lot of devices. Seng Sopeak explained that they are used to connect mobile phones to his laptop in order to install programmes.  But  not all phones can connect using the same device, and he has different types for all sorts of phones.  

When I showed up, Sopeak was busy changing the code number on a phone, allowing the phone to accept any SIM card, regardless of  the number.  

Having been in the job only two months, Sopeak is still learning.  “If I cannot switch up that mobile phone, I’ll have to hand it to other installers,  as I’ve worked for only a short time.  I’m not so qualified yet,” he admitted.

Sopeak installs programmes not just for Chinese mobile phones, but for all types.  Glancing at his laptop screen, I saw install-ation software for BlackBerry, Nokia and more.  Sopeak took about five minutes to install the programme, and a minute to change the phone’s code number.

It all looks mighty complicated, but Sopeak seems to understand it pretty well.

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