What's New?

What's New?

As Cambodia’s educational system develops rapidly, both public and private institutions of learning have seen notable improvements.  Study materials are no longer produced exclusively in Cambodia, but are also imported from abroad to support students.  Meanwhile, many new bookshops where students can buy all the necessary school supplies have opened their doors throughout the city.

Surprisingly, there are 20 bookshops surrounding Bak Touk high school and its environs.  Bak Touk is considered the central school in Phnom Penh.  There are various special private classes that operate in the school, and lots of bookshops have opened to meet this new demand.  

This week, “What’s New” discusses five bookshops that have opened next to one another near the high school.  As their owners realise that Bak Touk is the best block on which to do business, they are running their businesses non-traditionally, facing risk as well as reward.  

From my point of view, opening up five shops right next to one another is a bad idea for everyone involved.  First, all the sellers will  compete to have the lowest prices and the latest products.  

For instance, a new bookshop that opened  just a week ago had not been properly prepared.  It has no decorations and offers a poor selection of office and school supplies.  It has few customers, and in my opinion it may be forced to close.  

This trend may give buyers a chance to explore more products, but shoppers’ decisions will be complicated by having too many options.

I have been a customer at these stores, and my problem was the need to keep moving my motorbike from one to the next if I didn’t purchase anything.  Frankly, because the stores are so close together, I didn’t have a good shopping experience.  But if you go shopping on foot, you may enjoy the shops’ proximity.

MOST VIEWED

  • Protests planned in New York as Hun Sen to attend the UN

    Prime Minister Hun Sen will speak at the United Nations General Assembly in New York this week. But US-based supporters of the Supreme Court-dissolved Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP) plan to throw eggs at his car as part of a series of protests to coincide

  • CPP: ‘Behave or Sokha suffers’

    The ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) spokesman warned Kem Monovithya on Thursday that her attempt to damage “national reputation and prestige” would lead to her father, Kem Sokha, receiving even harsher punishment. Sok Eysan issued the warning as Monovithya, who is the court dissolved

  • News Analysis: Defiance can last for how long?

    The Cambodian government has so far stood strong in the face of mounting international pressure over its treatment of critics, but analysts, diplomats and ruling party officials now wonder how long the defiance can last. The European Union has led the firestorm of criticism, threatening

  • ‘Freedom fighters’ or ‘foreign puppets?’

    Former Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP) official Meach Sovannara was joined by supporters at a rally in California on Saturday, where a US lawmaker hailed members of the outlawed opposition as “great freedom fighters”. However, a Cambodian government spokesman said such a phrase belonged to