Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - After five years, case against Boeung Kak activists has trial date

After five years, case against Boeung Kak activists has trial date

Detained Boeung Kak community activists Kong Chantha (left) and Bo Chhorvy are escorted to the Appeal Court in Phnom Penh in 2015.
Detained Boeung Kak community activists Kong Chantha (left) and Bo Chhorvy are escorted to the Appeal Court in Phnom Penh in 2015. Hong Menea

After five years, case against Boeung Kak activists has trial date

Four Boeung Kak lake activists, including recently jailed community leader Tep Vanny, will face trial next month for a five-year-old case of insulting and obstructing public officials during a 2011 protest at City Hall.

The four activists – Kong Chantha, Bo Chhorvy, Heng Mom and Vanny – were charged by Phnom Penh Municipal Court in November 2011 under articles 502 and 504 of the Criminal Code, but later released on bail following a protest demanding a resolution to their land dispute.

Sam Sokunthea, the activists’ lawyer, confirmed that her clients will front court on September 19, but refused to comment further as she did not want it to influence an appeal of Vanny’s pre-trial detention in a separate case.

Vanny is facing an investigation into her alleged role in a protest outside Prime Minister Hun Sen’s house in 2013 to demand the release of fellow activist Yorm Bopha.

Chantha said that apart from being summonsed by the court once, the activists had never been notified of the case’s progress. “But no one called me to a hearing [before this]. I don’t understand if they want to arrest us or want to put pressure on Tep Vanny,” she said.

Insulting a public official can be punishable by one to six days in prison, whereas obstructing an official is punishable by six months to a year in prison.

Licadho’s technical coordinator Am Sam Ath said digging up an all-but-forgotten case only illustrated the government’s targeting of the activists, who have been at the forefront of the civil society-backed Black Monday campaign, which seeks the release of jailed human rights officials.

MOST VIEWED

  • NY sisters inspired by Khmer heritage

    Growing up in Brooklyn, New York, Cambodian-American sisters Edo and Eyen Chorm have always felt a deep affinity for their Cambodian heritage and roots. When the pair launched their own EdoEyen namesake jewellery brand in June, 2020, they leaned heavily into designs inspired by ancient Khmer

  • Omicron patients can stay home: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has given the green light for anyone who contracts the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron mutation or any other variant to convalesce or receive treatment at home or in any other reasonable non-healthcare setting. The new decision supersedes a restriction on home care for

  • The effects of the USD interest rate hike on Cambodian economy

    Experts weigh in on the effect of a potential interest rate expansion by the US Federal Reserve on a highly dollarised Cambodia Anticipation of the US Federal Reserve’s interest rate hike in March is putting developing economies on edge, a recent blog post by

  • Cambodia’s first ever anime festival kicks off Jan 22 at capital’s F3 centre

    Phnom Penh's first ever Anime Festival will bring together fans, artists, shops and other local businesses with ties to the Japanese animation style for cosplay competitions, online games, pop-up shops and more on January 22, with Friends Futures Factory (F3) hosting. F3 is a project that

  • PM eyes Myanmar peace troika

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has suggested that ASEAN member states establish a tripartite committee or diplomatic troika consisting of representatives from Cambodia, Brunei and Indonesia that would be tasked with mediating a ceasefire in Myanmar. The premier also requested that Nippon Foundation chairman Yohei Sasakawa

  • Demining rat ‘hero’ Magawa dead at 8

    A landmine-hunting rat that was awarded a gold medal for heroism for clearing ordnance from the Cambodian countryside has died, his charity said on January 11. Magawa, a giant African pouched rat originally from Tanzania, helped clear mines from about 225,000sqm of land – the equivalent of 42