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Beat AIDS with Buddha

Beat AIDS with Buddha

I have read your article "AIDS orphans figures soar in Cambodia," (PPPost,

Vol 10, No4, Feb 16-Mar 1, 2001).

The HIV virus that causes AIDS is as, in my opinion, just a concern for Cambodians

in recent years. It is clear that Cambodians never got worried about other things

much more than they have been tormented. They feel horrified if the death certainly

comes.

The figure that shows affected people, some 170,000 with HIV, the virus that causes

AIDS is a huge concern. Cambodia, unfortunately, is the most tormented one in comparison

with other neighbors.

In recent decades of history there have been a score of tragedies, calamities caused

by civil war and all these seem to make people tired of such a bad omen. But, fortunately,

a true national reconciliator has then saved it.

In retrospect all troubled things caused by civil war are forgotten, but as yet Cambodia

is facing another fierce enemy.

Today, in Cambodia it is a gigantic difference between the period of 50 years ago,

due to technological trends. Old habits, traditions, superstitions, which were normally

practiced now are socialized at each gap of every generation. Principally, Cambodia's

traditions, culture are assimilated and yet they prevent people from behaving illegally.

In a good mood, Cambodia has preserved its culture for a long time.

The expected percentage of HIV affected people will increase over time and the lives

of people, who are enjoying their happiness through sexual intercourse with prostitutes,

are threatened every minute. As a consequence, their best future will be killed if

they don't take care and continue the same practices.

Remember that Cambodians, above all, who are not well-educated, are easily exploited

by wealthy words of some people. As a result, they are victims and eventually they

would have committed anti-social activities banned by the government.

In short, from my own point of view, Cambodians should find out about Buddha's preaching

and respect culture to insulate their safety from being affected by this fierce epidemic.

(ñ Name withheld on request)

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