Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - COMMENT: In reply

COMMENT: In reply

COMMENT: In reply

The "Tales from the Archives" column was born in December last year with

one main aim: to publicize the National Archives of Cambodia (NAC) whose very existence

seems not to be well known among scholars of Cambodian history.

A lot of scholarly work is being produced and published every year solely based on

material available in France or elsewhere, while a trip to Phnom Penh is deemed unnecessary,

a deplorable fact given the NAC's large collection of unique sources on Cambodian

history. This is partly due to the myth that most of its holdings had been destroyed

during the Pol Pot period, which in the case of the NAC repository is entirely untrue.

For those who have ventured to Phnom Penh, research may have not seemed attractive

because decades of neglect and the loss of the catalogue have made access to its

holdings difficult. A project to redevelop the NAC has in the last two years improved

this situation.

The main purpose of the Post column and its footnote detailing location and opening

hours is therefore to promote awareness of these collections among researchers in

Cambodia and abroad, and not to present a piece of scholarly work.

The column tries to achieve this goal by focusing on entertaining anecdotes from

Cambodia's past, as we explained in the initial article.

Anecdotes by definition leave out a lot of context.

Furthermore each column is based on a very limited set of documents, usually a few

files only, which are indicated at the end of each article.

The column is meant to be a narrative account of what can be read in these very files,

a slice of history as Edwards writes, and does not pretend to be more than this.

I agree, however, that skipping the issue of forced labour and the many casualties

that made Bokor possible was a mistake.

Working with the written legacy of French rule in Cambodia at the NAC for the last

eight months, I would need more than one blind eye not to see the hardship and suffering

that it caused for a large proportion of the population.

The bloody crushing of rebellions in the 19th century; the protests in 1915-16 that

were a lot less peaceful than many accounts want us to believe; reports of the cruel

repression of the Phnongs in Kratie in the 1910s and 1920s, when military campaigns

burned down village after village of helpless peasants presumed to be opposed against

French rule; the accounts from the plantations in Kompong Cham in the 1930s, the

long lists of coolies wanted for running away from the labour camps; documents detailing

all these events are to be found in the NAC by researchers who decide to use this

vast resource.

They are stories however, that, given the concept of the column, will not be told

in "Tales from the Archives".

By presenting examples of files of the NAC that concentrate on humourous episodes,

we do not intend to create the impression that the past has been all glorious and

glamorous, a sanitized alternative to today's never-ending bloodshed.

The column will never be able to present a balanced analysis of its subjects in the

limited space it provides and based on the limited evidence it takes into account.

We therefore welcome the addition of further information from our readers whenever

its anecdotal style leaves important parts of the story untold.

MOST VIEWED

  • Massive stingrays may live in Mekong’s deep pools

    US scientists have suggested that unexplored deep pools in the Mekong River in an area of Stung Treng could potentially be home to significant populations of giant freshwater stingrays, one of the world’s largest freshwater fish species. This comes as a fisherman hooked a 180

  • PM takes time to meet, greet Cambodians living in the US

    After landing in the US ahead of the ASEAN-US Special Summit, Prime Minister Hun Sen was received by over 1,000 Cambodian-Americans including political analysts who welcomed him with greetings, fist bumps and selfies. Hun Sen also met with analyst Mak Hoeun, who had allegedly spoken ill

  • PM heads to Washington for ASEAN-US special summit

    Regional and international issues and how to bring the ASEAN-US partnership to another level will be discussed at length as Prime Minister Hun Sen and his ministers arrive in Washington, DC, for a special summit on May 12-13. During the trip, Hun Sen and ASEAN

  • National Assembly refutes EU resolution

    The National Assembly (NA) has hit back at a European Parliament resolution condemning the political and human rights situation in Cambodia, calling it another display of the Parliament’s “double standards”. Key points of the resolution include a warning that the Parliament could exclude the

  • Soaring global fuel prices: an opportunity for Cambodia?

    Cambodia is feeling the squeeze from the soaring global coal and oil prices. Electricity du Cambodge (EDC)would certainly be hurting from this reality, and most likely re-assessing its plans to add more coal power stations. EDC buys half of Cambodia’s electricity from plants

  • PM reflects on shoe throwing: Free speech or act of violence?

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on May 17 questioned whether a man who threw a shoe at him while he was in the US was exercising freedom of expression or if it was an act of hostility. Hun Sen was referring to an incident last week when