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Construction: MoU signed on building for Senate

Construction: MoU signed on building for Senate

Construction
The Senate has signed a memorandum of understanding with a Chinese company concerning the construction of a new plenary building, though officials said yesterday that they did not know how much it would cost or when work would commence.

Oum Sarith, the Senate’s secretary general, said plans for the building were being drawn up by the China City Construction Holding Group and would likely be finished “within three to six months”.

“We do not know the budget for the building or the time required to complete it,” he said. He added that the seven-storey building would be 5,000 square metres, and that it would include a meeting hall, offices for the nine Senate commissions and an “official party room”.

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