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Documentary on Angkor waters set for April

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
An arial view showing Angkor Wat and its moat in Siem Reap last year. ANA

Documentary on Angkor waters set for April

The Apsara National Authority (ANA) plans to release a documentary titled Water to Build Angkor early next month to demonstrate the importance of Cambodia’s ancient waterways.

ANA spokesman Long Kosal told The Post on March 17 that this was the first time the ANA had compiled such a documentary.

“The documentary is based on scientific evidence and the ANA’s direct observation and practice. So, the video has both practical and scientific aspects,” he said.

Kosal said the ANA wanted to show the public the important role water has had in building civilisation and Cambodia since ancient times.

“Water formed an important part of building the nation and made an especially important contribution in keeping a balance at Angkor Wat. That’s why we’ve dubbed it Water to Build Angkor,” he said.

He added that water had played an important role in promoting national development in the past, especially civilisation in the Angkor area. Angkor in the past was called a “water city” because the city had prospered by using water for the sake of constructions and economic development.

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Irrigation system in Angkor Resort area. ANA

“Through research, we know that Angkor Wat weighs tonnes. I questioned how the weight is sustained? This is the wonder of our Khmer ancestors. Angkor temple was built on sand, and this water retains the humidity of sand which plays a role as the foundation of the temple,” he elaborated.

According to research, the ancient waterways in the Angkor area have facilitated how the ANA can now effectively control water. Water from Kulen Mountain and rivers such as the Siem Reap, Roluos and Puok rivers can be diverted by the ANA to another site. The strong point of managing water in the Angkor area is that it can be retained in the dry and rainy seasons.

“It means that the ancient waterways our ancestors had built had been expertly managed. Through the ancient water management system we studied, researched and explored, we practiced what our ancestors had done. We just made something that already existed to operate again,” he said.

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