Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Dy Proem case stalled at Appeal Court: victim




Dy Proem case stalled at Appeal Court: victim

Dy Proem case stalled at Appeal Court: victim

The attorney of a Phnom Penh widow whose land was stolen by Prime Minister Hun Sen’s cousin and an accomplice – both of whom were convicted of graft in 2011, but never arrested – asked the Court of Appeal yesterday to pick up the pace on the 15-month-old proceedings against the pair.

Kao Ty, lawyer for 69-year-old victim Huoth Sarom submitted a letter to Appeal Court presiding judge Chuon Sunleng asking the court to accelerate the case, which was filed in January 2012 but has still yet to be heard.

“Until now, it has been 15 months since my client submitted her appeal lawsuit to the appeal court, but it hasn’t been held by the court yet,” said Ty, adding that the delay “has really affected my client’s interests and her living conditions”.

Sarom’s case was first submitted to the Phnom Penh Municipal Court in 2009, but was delayed five times before it was finally heard in October 2011.

The premier’s cousin, Dy Proem, was found guilty of paying $200,000 for a forged document granting her the title to Sarom’s land, and a then-government official Seng Yean was found guilty of accepting the bribe and forging the document.
Proem was sentenced to two-and-a-half years in prison, and Yean to four-and-a-half.

Both were asked to pay sizeable fines.

The court, however, never issued warrants for their arrest, arguing that it was not obligated to, despite the convictions and sentences.

The court also left out the matter of Sarom’s land, declining to rule on whether it would be returned to the widow, or whether she would be compensated for the loss.

“My client has been waiting to receive justice in this case for a long time,” Ty said yesterday.

Judge Sunleng, who is now in charge of the case, declined to comment on the matter, and the defendants’ lawyers, Khieu Sophal and Chhiv Theng, could not be reached yesterday.

MOST VIEWED

  • Vietnam: Tougher sentences for child abusers

    Several National Assembly (NA) deputies in Vietnam are calling for tougher penalties to be handed down to child abusers. They hope stricter punishments will act as a strong deterrent to prevent offenders committing further offences in the future. Extreme measures such as chemical castration were

  • Central bank to shun small US banknotes

    The National Bank of Cambodia (NBC) is considering not accepting smaller denominated US dollar banknotes – $1, $2 and $5 – from banks and microfinance institutions (MFIs) which it said are flooding its stockpile as the demand for those notes is low. While some banking insiders welcomed the move as

  • PM lauded in Covid-19 fight

    World Health Organisation (WHO) director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus sent a letter to Prime Minister Hun Sen thanking him for following the WHO’s guidance and commending Cambodia’s efforts in the fight against Covid-19. In his letter made public by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

  • Workers return, hope for salaries

    More than 600 factory workers in the capital’s Chaom Chao commune in Por Sen Chey district returned to work after the factory’s owner promised to pay their salaries in instalments until the middle of next month. On Tuesday and Wednesday, more than 600 workers gathered

  • Women detained for forcing kids to beg

    Two women were sent to Phnom Penh Municipal Court on Thursday for forcing six children to beg for money for several months at the Chhouk Meas market in Krang Thnong commune in the capital’s Sen Sok district. Phnom Penh Department of Anti-human Trafficking and

  • Vietnamese tents baffle border guards

    Kandal and Takeo provincial authorities bordering Vietnam have expressed concern after witnessing irregularities by the Vietnamese authorities, including the deployment of soldiers to erect 114 camps just 30m from the border. Takeo provincial governor Ouch Phea told The Post on Thursday that Vietnamese soldiers had erected 83