Subscribe Search

Search form

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Evictees sick as rubbish piles up

Evictees sick as rubbish piles up

A Borei Keila villager sifts rice next to piles of rubbish outside her home in Phnom Penh
A Borei Keila villager sifts rice next to piles of rubbish outside her home in Phnom Penh. KHOUTH SOPHAK CHAKRYA

Evictees sick as rubbish piles up

Evictees of Phnom Penh’s Borei Keila community appealed yet again to municipal authorities for alternative housing yesterday, saying garbage and waste has inundated their current settlement and is making it increasingly difficult to enter and exit the area.

Borei Keila residents were evicted from their land on January 3 last year as Phan Imex employees, backed by local authorities, demolished about 300 homes.
Many have lived in tents at the site ever since.

“We demand that Phnom Penh municipal officials and the company [Phan Imex] publicly announce where they stand in solving the housing problem in [the] Borei Keila development area,” village representative Sar Sorn said. “We do not trust their promises anymore because we are living without government protection.”

Respiratory infections and diarrhoeal diseases are plaguing the community due to the settlement’s lack of public infrastructure, mounting waste problem and polluted environment.

Has Sochenda, 34, a six-months pregnant evictee, told the Post she is worried the settlement’s increasingly toxic environment will damage the health of her unborn baby.

“Currently, our living conditions are worse than pets’ because rubbish has been thrown on our roof and is blocking our path. But there are no [municipal] officials involved to solve the problem,” she said.

Long Dimanche, spokesman for the capital’s municipal hall, and Veal Vong commune chief Keo Sakal could not be reached for comment.

Yi Soksan, a senior investigator for rights group Adhoc, said the Borei Keila land dispute needed to be addressed by government officials immediately for the sake of national policy and development.

“Leaving the small problems [behind] will only make those problems become bigger and more complicated, which leads to serious human rights violations,” Soksan said.


  • Kak Channthy, Cambodian Space Project frontwoman, killed in crash at 38 [Updated]

    Updated 5:05pm, Tuesday, March 20, 2018 Kak Channthy, frontwoman of popular The Cambodian Space Project, was killed Tuesday morning in a traffic accident in Phnom Penh. She was 38. Channthy, the internationally recognised singer-songwriter also known as “Srey Thy”, was reportedly travelling in a tuk-tuk on the city's

  • Australians protest Asean summit visit by PM Hun Sen

    Hundreds of protesters gathered in Sydney’s Hyde Park on Friday to protest against Cambodian strongman Hun Sen, who claimed to have been gifted millions of dollars by the Australian government ahead of a special Asean summit this weekend. An estimated 300 protesters, the majority of

  • One Australian, one Cambodian killed in explosion at military base

    Updated: 5:20pm, Friday 16 March 2018 An Australian tourist and a Cambodian soldier were killed in an explosion on Thursday afternoon at an army base in Cambodia’s Kampong Speu province. The Australian, whom the government initially identified as a technical demining expert in his 40s, and

  • Peeling back layers of prehistory in Battambang

    When the man passed away, he had not yet reached 50. He belonged to a tribe that had settled near the Sangker River in Battambang province, likely cultivating the fields and raising animals. On the side, they hunted for boars, and even turtles, one of which