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Exam score blunder solved

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Students file complaints with the Ministry of Education earlier this week over the results of their high school examinations. Heng Chivoan

Exam score blunder solved

The Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport on Thursday said its computerised score calculation process had experienced technical problems that affected the mathematics examination scores of 740 classes.

This was found when its committee, established to address dissatisfaction over the results of the high school, investigated the complaints.

After solving the technical problem, the results of the August 20 examinations showed that the total number of successful candidates is now 76,034 (67.07 per cent). There are now 408 grade-A candidates, grade-B (2,222), grade-C (6,041), grade-D (15,180) and grade-E (52,183).

The ministry will issue new results for science classes on Friday on the ministry’s Facebook page and on Saturday in the education department.

Ministry spokesman Dy Khamboly told The Post yesterday: “The ministry has already corrected [the error] and the new results will be announced on Friday. These will be the nationwide results.”

The announcement came on the back of the Cambodian Independent Teachers Association (CITA) on Thursday asking the ministry to delay scholarship and university entrance examinations in order to give the newly established committee another week to examine high school students’ complaints about their examinations results.

In a letter addressed to the minister, Hang Chuon Naron, CITA said many students had filed complaints about the mathematics portion of the test.

The document asks that entrance and scholarship examinations be delayed so that students filing a complaint may know their true score.

“We note the irregularity in the students’ examination results. The results disappointed them, especially the outstanding mathematics students."

“On behalf of CITA, I would like to ask the ministry to delay the examinations until there is a solution for the complaints,” said Ouk Chayavy, CITA president.

Khamboly told The Post on Thursday that the ministry had received CITA’s letter, but the committee is continuing to work on reviews.

“There is no policy yet. Let’s give time for the committee to work first before issuing a policy. We need time to work … the committee is actively working day and night,” he said.

Khamboly said as of Thursday evening, more than 1,000 students had submitted complaints to the ministry over the examination results.

After a surge in complaints earlier this week, the ministry formed a committee with the sole purpose of addressing the issues.

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