Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Fake anti-viral programs buy false sense of security

Fake anti-viral programs buy false sense of security

Fake anti-viral programs buy false sense of security

Dear Editor,

Ironically,

the day the article "A virus that can spread in a flash" appeared in

The Phnom Penh Post (March 31, 2009) I had a run-in with the tech

specialist at my office about using my flash drive in company

computers. After a long drawn-out discussion, I finally produced my

laptop and ran a virus scan to show him that the drive was virus-free

and he agreed to let me use it on the office computers.

He

went on to show me that the office computers were equipped with three

different kinds of anti-malware, anti-spyware, anti-viral software.

Of

course they were all pirated copies, and when I returned home I plugged

the drive into my laptop again my anti-viral program informed me that

the drive had 15 viruses on it; and he was worried about me giving him

a virus!

As stated in your article, most anti-virus programs update themselves from a library of known viruses.

Of

course if you are in Asia, you may acquire a virus different from those

in Europe or North America, but if you are an actual paying customer

you can usually count on being protected. My current program, for

example, often encounters rootkits, viruses and malware that it cannot

fix, but as a paying customer I simply click "send log" and get a

solution from their tech people in a couple hours.  

I agree

that turning off the autorun features on your computer is a good way to

protect yourself from "flash spread" viruses and that having more than

one anti-viral program is a good idea, but an even better idea is to

use genuine software, with an actual serial number and an actual

activation code.  

Too often buying pirated anti-viral programs from the market is simply buying a false sense of security.

Zac Kendall

Phnom Penh

Send

letters to: [email protected] or P.O.鈥圔ox 146, Phnom Penh,

Cambodia. The Post reserves the right to edit letters to a shorter

length.

MOST VIEWED

  • Proof giants walked among us humans?

    For years a debate has waged about whether certain bas relief carvings at the 12th-century To Prohm Temple, one of the most popular attractions at the Angkor Wat Temple Complex in Siem Reap province, depicted dinosaurs or some rather less exotic and more contemporary animal,

  • Japan bank buys major stake in ANZ Royal Bank

    Japan's largest bank acquired more than half of ANZ’s shares in Cambodia on Thursday, according to a statement from Kith Meng’s Royal Group. Japan's JTrust Bank, announced that they had acquired a 55% of stake in ANZ Royal Bank. According to a Royal Group

  • Long way to go before Cambodia gets a ‘smart city’

    Phnom Penh, Siem Reap and Battambang will struggle to attain smart city status without adopting far reaching master plans, according to officials tasked with implementing the program. The brainchild of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean), the smart city program seeks to link up

  • China-Cambodia tourism forum held

    The Cambodian tourism sector must be prepared to welcome a growing number of Chinese tourists, as they lead the globe in the number of outbound travellers and were responsible for the most visitors to the Kingdom last year, the country’s tourism minister said on