Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Fishy hunting practice

Fishy hunting practice

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

Fishy hunting practice


The illegal practice of ‘poison hunting’ and the overuse of pesticides to contaminate watering holes poses a considerable risk to the three critically endangered vulture species that inhabit the Northern Plains of Cambodia, the Wildlife Conservation Society warned in a press release on Tuesday.

WCS-trained local communities and law enforcement since 2016 have documented several instances of poisoned watering holes resulting in dead animals across Preah Vihear, Stung Treng and Mondulkiri provinces.

Among the victims were the critically endangered slender-billed vulture, the large-spotted civet and woolly-necked stork. ‘Communities across the Northern Plains are known to use termite poison as a low-cost method to kill wildlife as a source of food but also to protect rice fields from birds such as doves and parakeets,’ said WCS Project Coordinator Mao Khean.

WCS Country Director Ken Sereyrotha warns that the use of poison ‘has the potential to cause irreversible impacts on globally threatened bird and mammal populations’. In emailed comments, WCS spokesman Eng Mengey said the highly toxic insecticide carbofuran (pictured above dried onto the skin of a dead fish) is a major culprit, identified through analysis of the dead animal’s stomach.

The concern, he said, is that vultures may feed on dead animals and subsequently be killed as well. ‘So far this year, we have found two poisoning cases, while in 2016 we found 8 poisoning cases,’ Mengey said.

Photo courtesy of WCS

MOST VIEWED

  • With herd immunity likely in 2022, is Cambodia ready to reopen for tourism?

    The government aims to inoculate 80 per cent of the target population by June next year, giving it a head start among regional peers to reboot the sector but first, it has to do a few things to up its game A sign on a glass

  • Quarantine still a must for all arrivals, in next Covid chapter

    Since early May, an average of five to 10 Cambodian people have died from Covid-19 a day with many others testing positive amid the ongoing community outbreak. At the same time, however, hundreds of patients also recovered a day. The first Covid-19 case in Cambodia was

  • US wants 'full access' to Ream Naval Base

    On June 11, the US embassy's Defense Attaché Colonel Marcus M Ferrara visited Ream Nava Base in coordination with Cambodian officials following the recent approval of Prime minister Hun Sen to allay the concerns on Chinese military presence at the base as raised by US Deputy

  • Jab drive heading to 5 provinces

    The government is set to vaccinate more than 1.2 million people in five provinces after finishing with Phnom Penh and neighbouring Kandal in an ongoing campaign administered by the ministries of Health and National Defence. The five provinces are Preah Sihanouk, Kampong Speu, Takeo, Kampong Cham

  • New immigration bill targets illegal foreigners in Kingdom

    General Department of Immigration (GDI) officials are discussing revisions to the new draft law on immigration to prevent foreigners from entering Cambodia illegally and to supervise those living in the Kingdom more effectively. The revisions draw wide support among civil society organisations. GDI director-general Kirth

  • First commercial gold mine online

    Australian miner Renaissance Minerals (Cambodia) Ltd on June 21 began the commercial operation of its $120 million Okvau Gold Project in the northeastern province of Mondulkiri, becoming the Kingdom’s first gold producer. Located in the Okvau area in southwestern Mondulkiri province’s Keo Seima district, the