Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - German Witches Demand Rites

German Witches Demand Rites

German Witches Demand Rites

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) - Witches in the U.S. military have tried to keep a low profile,

but they've been coming out in the open in a fuss over their use of a troop recreation

center for their meetings.

It all began when the military paper Stars and Stripes quoted Air Force Staff Sgt.

Nathan Crisp, himself a wiccan-as witches prefer to call themselves-as saying harassment

is part of being a witch, so they generally keep to themselves.

The newspaper later published a letter complaining about a "pagan support group"

meeting at the U.S. military recreation center at the Vogelwen American housing area

in Kaiserslautern.

Since then, many soldier-witches have come forward to complain about that attitude.

"We do not conduct sacrifices-animal or human," Ivy Nelson, another witchcraft-practicing

American army member wrote in a letter to Stars and Stripes.

Nelson, a 34-year-old army specialist, told the Associated Press that about 30 Americans,

most of them in the U.S military, regularly attend wiccans meetings in Kaiserslautern

and that another 100 were on their mailing list.

The newspaper has received at least 15 letters from practicing pagans, says Cheri

Tellez of the letters to the editor department.

Senior Airman Melissa R. Ujczo-Kovachich, stationed at the Ramstein Air Base, said

the initial letter complaining about the group, by Melody Hull, "caused me so

much pain."

"I would love to talk to her and explain my beliefs to her. However, I'm afraid

she would be too busy stacking kindling around my feet," Ujczo-Kovachich wrote

in her letter to the editor.

U.S. Air Force Major Dave Turner, a spokesman for the Kaiserslautern military community,

says the wiccans have a right to meet and practice their beliefs.

"We've never had any problems with them, " he said.

MOST VIEWED

  • Two luxury hotels latest quarantine options for inbound travellers

    The Inter-Ministerial Committee to Combat Covid-19 has designated two luxury hotels as alternative quarantine options for travellers who wish to enter Cambodia through Phnom Penh International Airport – Sokha Phnom Penh Hotel & Residence and the Courtyard by Marriott Phnom Penh. In a notice detailing guidelines issued

  • Visa A holders get to quarantine at Himawari Hotel

    The Ministry of Health has permitted foreign diplomats, UN and International NGO officials to undergo quarantine at Himawari Hotel in the capital in case they do not have a separate place suitable for this purpose, but the government would not be responsible for the expenses.

  • Baby saved as mother is lost to Covid

    Newborn baby Neth David has had a rough start in the world. His mother, Vong Daneth, was seven months pregnant when she contracted a severe case of Covid-19. When it became clear to her doctors that she would not survive, they performed a cesarean section

  • Jabs for kids bring hope for school reopenings

    Cambodia is tentatively planning to reopen schools – at least at the secondary level – when the vaccination of children aged 12-17 is completed, even though daily transmissions and deaths in other age groups remain high. Schools across the country have been suspended since March 20, one month

  • Governor: Covid subsides in capital

    Phnom Penh municipal governor Khuong Sreng said the Covid-19 situation in the capital’s 14 districts has eased, with only two districts still recording a high number of infections. “Transmission cases in all districts are dropping, though they are relatively higher Meanchey and Por Sen Chey.

  • Hun Sen: Get 12-17 age group ready for Covid jabs

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has told parents of children aged 12-17 in Phnom Penh and the provinces of Kandal and Preah Sihanouk to get them ready for vaccinations soon. “There is a need to vaccinate children and youths aged 12 to 17. According to the statistics provided