Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Gonzalez-Davidson charges confirmed

Gonzalez-Davidson charges confirmed

Gonzalez-Davidson charges confirmed

Koh Kong Provincial Court yesterday confirmed that deported environmental activist Alex Gonzalez-Davidson has been officially charged as an accomplice to three jailed anti-dredging activists from his NGO Mother Nature.

On Friday the Post reported that Tha Sophea, wife of one of the three activists, had learned of the charges from her imprisoned husband, Sem Samnang.

Yesterday court director Huon Many said it was fact. “The jailed activists confessed that [Alex] supported them with money. It means he is an accomplice. He offered money and the way to commit [the crime], so this is the accomplice charge,” Many said.

He added that while the court has “no idea” how to issue a warrant for Gonzalez as they do not know his location, they will try him in absentia.

“The accomplice is to be sentenced the same as the perpetrator,” Many said before referring other questions to investigating judge Chhun Davy, who could not be reached.

MOST VIEWED

  • CNRP supporters rally in the streets of Tokyo

    Supporters of the Supreme Court-dissolved Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP) on Monday rallied on the streets of Tokyo, demanding Prime Minister Hun Sen’s resignation and urging the Japanese government to “save democracy in the Kingdom”. Some 400 protesters in the rally, which was organised by

  • Over 100 Chinese nationals to be deported for online scam

    The Ministry of Interior is planning to deport 128 Chinese nationals after they were arrested in Preah Sihanouk province on Wednesday for their alleged involvement in an online money extortion scam. Y Sokhy, the head of the Department of Counter-terrorism and Transnational Crime, told The Post

  • LPG gas explosion injures 13 people, including foreigners, in Siem Reap

    An explosion on Wednesday at a liquid petroleum gas (LPG) car and tuk-tuk refuelling station in Siem Reap city has left 13 people, including an American and a Briton, suffering burns. The seven most severely burned, including a provincial police officer, were sent to a Thai

  • The French mother navigating the capital in her own personal tuk-tuk

    French woman Cecile Dahome gracefully manoeuvres her tuk-tuk through the manic streets of Phnom Penh with the precision of a Japanese katana before a herd of motorcyclists, attempting to perform illegal U-turns, cuts her off. The riders, like baby ducklings following their mother’s tracks,