Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Govt flunking vital indicators: report

Govt flunking vital indicators: report

Govt flunking vital indicators: report

Despite economic development, government spending on health and education still among lowest in developing world, group claims.

THE government's efforts to address patterns of deprivation and inequality are inadequate, according to a new report, which highlights "serious concerns" about the population's access to health, food, education, housing and potable water.

In a fact sheet released March 23, the US-based Centre for Economic and Social Rights said that, despite solid economic growth, the Kingdom lags behind in key economic and social indicators.

"Cambodia's GDP per capita continues to rise steadily. ... However, government expenditure on health and education is comparatively very low," the report says.

The report found that government expenditures totalled 3.5 percent of GDP - the lowest level of all low-income countries  assessed - compared with 9.3 percent for Laos and 12.1 percent for Papua New Guinea.

Shelling out for health care

In addition, the report highlighted a "lack of government commitment" to providing needed health care, and noted that Cambodians spend more of their private income on medical treatments than people in other low-income countries. They paid a total of 5.8 percent of GDP for health care in 2006, compared with 4.5 percent in Vietnam and just 2.9 percent in Laos.

The report also commented on the decline in access to clean water and adequate housing, especially in urban areas where access to water has declined and four in five people live in substandard settlements, it said.

The group's fact sheet, prepared from local and international data sources, was released in advance of Cambodia's five-year report to the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in May.

MOST VIEWED

  • Government hits back at threats to pull EBA, suspend UN seat

    The spokesman for the ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) has said the government is in no way concerned after the European Parliament gave it three months to reverse what it called the “systematic repression of the political opposition”. Ignoring the ultimatum could mean facing

  • Chinese influx pushing locals, Westerners out of Preah Sihanouk

    Some within the Kingdom’s tourism industry have speculated that the recent influx of Chinese visitors may hinder domestic tourism as the price of accommodations in the coastal city of Sihanoukville continues to rise. Preah Sihanouk province, which has become a hotbed for Chinese investment

  • Sar Kheng: Sokha requested security

    Interior Minister Sar Kheng on Sunday revealed the story behind the transfer of former opposition party leader Kem Sokha from Trapaing Phlong prison in Tbong Khmum province to his house in the capital. Speaking at the ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) headquarters in Prey

  • ‘Dire consequences’ from sanctions, warns AmCham

    American businesspeople in Cambodia have warned that any sanction against the Kingdom would have “dire consequences” that could push Cambodia even further into the arms of China. In a letter to US senators and representatives dated Monday, the American Chamber of Commerce Cambodia (AmCham) said