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How to weather a crisis

How to weather a crisis

A s all residents in Phnom Penh recall, the CMAC mine detonation on May 30 caused

severe panic in the capital. While the alarm was false, what should people do in

order to prepare themselves in the event of a real crisis?

The following information was compiled from a variety of sources including several

security officers based in Phnom Penh. It is presented here as a general service

to the public:

The first lesson gained from May 30 is that the phone system will not work. The

enormous number of calls flooding the various systems in efforts to get information

will basically jam the networks such that no calls can be made.

VHF or HF radios are a good way to keep informed. If you have a radio already,

its better to listen to it than make calls.

Turn on your TV if you have one and try to get whatever information might be broadcast.

Avoid making rash decisions based on rumors.

Assume all shops will close immediately. Whatever you think you will need in the

event of a crisis should be bought now.

Key items: batteries, flashlights, candles enough food for at least four days,

a basic medical kit, cigarettes (for smokers who may feel on edge), cooking gas,

and fuel for generators.

Water: be prepared to provide your own drinking water for four days.

Have ready access to some amount of cash.

Know where your key documents are; keep copies of them in a separate place.

Avoid travel. Stay in your office or home until you have adequate information

on what is really happening. If you have to travel, avoid main roads. On May 30 Monivong

was totally gridlocked. Use side streets.

Foreigners should register with their respective embassies and inform them of

their current address. Most Embassies have plan to get in touch with their citizens

in the event of crisis. Check with your embassy to find out what the plan is.

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