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Letter: Salaries rising?

Letter: Salaries rising?

Salaries rising?

I read your article on the shortage of skilled workers and the rising pay-scale.

The UNDP audit goes to show how organizations squander funds contributed by member

nations. As we all know, NGOs aren't much better when many have administrative expenses

of up to 80% of available funds. What I am objecting to is the statements made by

that Sandra D'Amico.

Salaries in the range of $2,000 to $5,000 are paid to a select few of multi-nationals.

How can she maintain that overall salaries and wages are rising when the economy

is unable to create enough new jobs for high school and college graduates? After

all, recruiters' statements have to be taken with a grain of salt. They get their

commission based on the first-year salary.

Your report as such is misleading as it neglects to put the economic outlook, despite

the great growth rates, into perspective and give actual numbers, e. g. the number

of managers who make those salaries vs. the number of people who still get minimum

pay. For instance, how much do doctors at the Calamette hospital make? How many positions

are there that make $5,000 a month? How many graduates of the Pannasastra University

get $300 upon graduation?

We are talking single digits here and not huge numbers. Unfortunately, there aren't

any hard workforce statistics available as many employees work in a grey sector by

not reporting their salaries in order to avoid paying taxes.

Overall, I found your report created a false impression about the Cambodian job market.

After all, we are concerned with Cambodian workers and not foreigners at the NGOs

or inflated jobs at UN

organisations.

Jay Engelhardt
Cape Coral, FL, USA

Former business owner in Cambodia

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