Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Market Life

Market Life

Market Life

As a crimson sun climbs out of the nearby Tonle Bassac, the market is already

abuzz. Vendors display their goods and call out their prices. Customers sort

through the morning's offerings of fish, fruit and fresh produce. Men weave

overloaded motorbikes between crowded stalls. Women squat on the streets amid

bags of cockleshells and flower baskets. Beggars plead for spare change, while

flies swarm on hook-hung meat.

This is Kandal Market at 7 am - colorful,

loud, packed and pungent. It's a scene much like other Phnom Penh markets coming

to life all over the city, as they have for generations.

But this will

soon change, as traditional Khmer markets are slowly being outpaced by bigger,

cleaner, modern shopping centers and displaced by skyrocketing land prices in

downtown Phnom Penh. The French Development Agency (FDA), the organization

charged with renovating the capital's biggest downtown markets, plans to

eventually demolish and rebuild both Psar Chas and Psar Kandal - after the

initial renovation of Psar Thmei.

"Most of the sellers at Kandal Market

are poor," said Heam Sarun, a 55-year-old ice vendor at Kandal Market. "When

[the government] builds the new market, I will lose my job and most of the

vendors here will lose their jobs because they are very poor and not able to buy

even a small stall in the new market. Every day I can earn 10,000 to 20,000 riel

selling ice. That just enough to make a living for my family."

Soun

Vanny, 51, a mixed goods vendor at Psar Chas, is fearful of plans to renovate.

"I want the market to remain the same because previously when markets

were renovated, vendors had to spend money for everything such as buying new

shopping stalls," she said. "We are not able to buy shopping stalls because we

are poor vendors. Now, I can earn 10,000 riel in profit-just enough for the food

for one day. I am a widow. I have ten members in my family and only I earn

money."

Kandal market has been a historical feature in Phnom Penh since

it's original opening in 1915. It was reopened in 1989 after its abandonment

during the Pol Pot regime. No date has been set for the renovation, but when it

happens it will mark the end of a way of life of the people who open their

stalls each and every morning.

MOST VIEWED

  • Angkor Wat named as the top landmark for the second year

    Travel website TripAdvisor has named Cambodia’s ancient wonder Angkor Wat as the top landmark in the world for the second year running in their Travelers’ Choice Award 2018, an achievement Cambodian tourism operators expect will attract more tourists to the Kingdom. The website uses traveller

  • New US bill ‘is a violation of Cambodian independence’

    After a US congressmen introduced bipartisan legislation that will enact sanctions on Cambodian officials responsible for “undermining democracy” in the Kingdom, government officials and the ruling Cambodian People’s Party on Sunday said they regarded the potential action as the “violation of independence and sovereignty

  • Hun Sen detractors ‘will die’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Wednesday said those who curse or insult him would eventually die without a plot of land to bury their bodies after being killed by lightning, suffering the same fate as those who recently died in Thmar Baing district in Koh

  • Ministry’s plan for net sparks fears

    The government has ordered all domestic and international internet traffic in the Kingdom to pass through a Data Management Centre (DMC) that has been newly created by the state-owned Telecom Cambodia, in a move some have claimed is an attempt to censor government critics. Spokesman