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NEC cites inaccuracy rate of 3%

A young woman looks for her name on a voter registration list in Prey Veng province during the 2013 national elections.
A young woman looks for her name on a voter registration list in Prey Veng province during the 2013 national elections. Vireak Mai

NEC cites inaccuracy rate of 3%

About 3 percent of registered voters’ data has been found to contain inaccuracies, according to a National Election Committee official, who said the figure was inconsequential.

“The error is about 3 percent or less . . . there are problems facing voter registration, but they are not serious,” NEC deputy secretary-general Som Sorida said in a workshop at the Himawari Hotel yesterday, adding that the error mainly arose from computer operators who had input the wrong data.

According to NEC spokesman Hang Puthea, most of the errors involved mistyping voters’ gender, but a working group of 50 staffers was in place to examine and verify voter data.

“The working group verifies the data sent to NEC’s servers . . . by making reference to each voter’s identity card,” he said.

Sorida, for his part, maintained that a “3 percent [rate] of technical errors does not affect voter registration”.

This was disputed by Koul Panha, director of election watchdog Comfrel, who called the 3 percent error “a lot”.

“At Comfrel, we believe good data is at least 98 percent accurate,” he said, adding that the NGO plans to audit all voter data after the registration period and give feedback to the NEC.

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