Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Nobel Prize: a bit of solace for the maimed

Nobel Prize: a bit of solace for the maimed

Nobel Prize: a bit of solace for the maimed

T HE awarding of the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize to the global drive to outlaw landmines

was greeted in Cambodia with reactions ranging from joy, surprise and puzzlement,

to pragmatism over the long road ahead to ridding the country of mines.

"I've been shrieking in the office, jumping for joy," said Denise Coghlan,

coordinator of the anti-landmine campaign in Cambodia, when she heard the International

Campaign to Ban Landmines had won the coveted award.

"It will have a great impact on the lives of the people who have worked so hard

on the campaign, particularly the amputees; it will restore their dignity and energy,"

she said.

"I'm stunned," said another member of the campaign, Patty Curran, adding:

"I'm sitting here now with a class of landmine survivors and they're all very

happy."

The awarding of the prize to the international campaign and its world coordinator,

American Jody Williams, was announced Oct 10.

For 35-year-old Chan Phaly, an amputee former soldier begging on a Phnom Penh street,

the prize meant very little. "I don't know what the Nobel prize is," said

Phaly, who lost most of his left leg to a landmine.

But he supported anything which helped to get a ban on the devices, saying: "I

would ask people to stop laying mines."

Double amputee Tun Chan-nareth, who was slated to possibly jointly receive the prize

on behalf of the campaign at Post press time, was elated. "I feel surprised

about this prize. I think I will receive it within the month in Oslo," Channareth

said. "This is important for the young generation. We want to rid the country

completely of mines. It is a big job with big difficulties."

Channareth lost his legs near the Thai border in 1982 serving with the Son Sann resistance

forces.

"When I just got injured, I thought I wanted to die all the time. I think other

disabled people have the same idea."

He recalled how he had wanted to carry out his own crude amputation of one of his

injured legs after the mine blast: "I borrowed an axe from a villager and wanted

to cut one of my own legs off because it was [damaged] and didn't work, but my friend

wouldn't let me," he recalled. "He helped me get to Khao-I-Dang [refugee

camp] and the doctors cut it off there."

Since becoming involved with the campaign in 1994, Channareth has toured several

capitals meeting world leaders. He even rode a hand-cranked tricycle from Brussels

to Paris in June 1997 to shed light on the cause.

"I have traveled a lot," he said. "I felt surprised when I would talk

to people and they would agree with my ideas."

He has addressed the UK Parliament, and met with the Irish Prime Minister and the

Queen of Spain. One of the crowning moments of his travels was a visit to the Vatican

to plead with the Pope for support.

"I only had ten fingers to beg him and encourage him to ban mines," he

said with his palms clasped. "I couldn't count the number of people who came

to see him in that huge building. He blessed us then afterwards announced three times

to support banning landmines in 1995."

Fellow double amputee and campaigner Soun Chreouk spoke of the camaraderie they share

with other mine victims around the world. "We were all hopeless when we lost

our limbs. We didn't want to live," he recalled. "But when we saw others

with the same condition, we became better."

Campaigner Sok Eng, who played a key role in having Cambodia sign the treaty, said

that it had been an uphill battle to convince the authorities to sign the ban. "If

you wait until they open the door, they don't open it," she said. "You

have to jump ... Anytime we can jump, we jump."

In a country where decades of conflict have left an estimated six million landmines

in the ground, experts agree that a mine-free Cambodia will be a long time coming.

"It still doesn't solve the problem of getting the land mines out of the ground,"

said Mark Pirie, of the British mine-clearance agency Halo Trust, of the Nobel prize.

While welcoming the awarding of the prize, and the international campaign's call

for landmine stocks to be destroyed, he added: "It's the landmines in the ground

that kill and maim, not the ones kept in storage."

Demining experts say it will take generations to clear the land mines of Cambodia,

where 2,600 mined areas have been verified, covering 3,600 square kilometers. Less

than 50 square kilometers have been cleared.

Some 40,000 Cambodians - or one in every 250 people - have lost limbs to landmines,

and more than 100 civilians are killed or maimed every month by them.

Borithy Lun, a coordinator for the British-funded Cambodia Trust which cares for

landmine victims, said the Nobel was "very good news indeed".

"But our work is going on. Looking after the victims of landmines is an ongoing

process. You have to care for people for the rest of their lives," he said.

"I hope the prize will give a stimulus in terms of fund-raising. Maybe now there's

light at the end of the tunnel, the problem is ending - that's the glimmer of hope."

Happiness at the awarding of the Nobel was, however, tarnished by the fact that fresh

mines continue to be laid in Cambodia.

The Khmer Rouge's clandestine radio announced Oct 11, the day after the Nobel prize

announcement was made, that they had laid more of the devices in Cambodia's northwest.

Four days later - in a clear response to the Nobel prize - the KR were moved to defend

their use of mines. Claiming that the Vietnamese occupying army in the 1980s laid

most of Cambodia's mines, the KR implied in an Oct 15 broadcast that "the Vietnamese

communists" were still present here.

Citing the United Nations Charter, KR radio claimed that its forces had the right

to use "any type of weapon" to defend Cambodia's sovereignty from "Vietnamese

aggression".

MOST VIEWED

  • ‘Education’ a priority traffic-law penalty

    A top National Police official on June 21 neither rejected nor confirmed the authenticity of a leaked audio message, which has gone viral on social media, on a waiver of fines for a number of road traffic-related offences. General Him Yan, deputy National Police chief in

  • Volunteer scheme to foster ‘virtuous’ humanitarian spirit

    A senior education official said volunteer work contributes to solidarity and promotes a virtuous humanitarian spirit among the youth and communities. Serei Chumneas, undersecretary of state at the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport, made the comment during the opening of a training programme called “

  • Chinese firms unveil preliminary results on metro, monorail for capital

    Minister of Public Works and Transport Sun Chanthol and representatives from China Road and Bridge Corp (CRBC) and its parent company, the state-owned China Communications Construction Co Ltd (CCCC), met on June 24 for talks on results of the firms’ preliminary study on a potential metro

  • ACLEDA, WU to enable global money transfers

    Cambodia's largest commercial bank by total assets ACLEDA Bank Plc and global money transfer firm Western Union (WU) have partnered to offer customers cross-border money transfers to 200 countries via “ACLEDA mobile” app. In Channy, president and group managing director of ACLEDA, said the June 22 agreement

  • Aeon, Micromax partner again for third mall

    AEON Mall (Cambodia) Co Ltd and a locally-owned Micromax Co Ltd have entered into a partnership agreement to develop fibre optic infrastructure for $200 million Aeon Mall 3, which is expected to be opened in 2023. The agreement was signed on June 20 between Masayuki Tsuboya, managing director of

  • Walmart plans to diversify stock of Cambodia goods

    Walmart Inc, the world’s biggest retailer, on June 22 reiterated recent plans to scale up and greatly diversify its purchases of Cambodian products, according to the labour ministry. This came during a virtual working meeting between Minister of Labour and Vocational Training Ith Samheng and