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Official transferred after pointing at car with foot

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The deputy director of the Siem Reap provincial Registration and Driver’s Licence Unit has been transferred for pointing at a car number plate with her foot. Photo supplied

Official transferred after pointing at car with foot

The deputy director of the Siem Reap provincial Registration and Driver’s Licence Unit at the Department of Public Works and Transport who last week pointed at the number plate of a car taken in for a technical check with her foot has been transferred.

Sim Sophat’s transfer to the department’s General Affairs Bureau came after social media criticism that she had committed misconduct and an indecent act.

“She has to appear at the General Affairs Bureau every working hour. The General Affairs Bureau, the Registration and Driver’s Licence Unit and Sophat have to cooperate to ensure the resolution is executed effectively,” states a letter dated Friday by Ky Virin, the provincial director of Public Works and Transport.

The Ministry of Public Works said on Facebook on Saturday that Sophat had been transferred to general administration for misconduct while providing services.

“If people encounter misconduct from Ministry of Public Works and Transport officials when receiving public services, please report it, attaching names, identification, times and locations, as well as pictures, video and any other evidence so that we can take action according to procedures,” the ministry said.

Ministry spokesman Kong Vimean said Sophat’s transfer had been an administrative move and that the Siem Reap provincial Department of Public Works would look into why she had behaved in such a manner.

If she was found to have committed misconduct, the Department of Public Works and the provincial hall would take further action.

“The Department of Public Works and Transport will continue to investigate why Sophat committed such misconduct. If we find fault, the department can send a letter to Siem Reap Provincial Hall requesting her removal,” he said.

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