Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Police chief orders loud exhaust pipe clampdown

Police chief orders loud exhaust pipe clampdown

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Banteay Meanchey provincial police on Sunday destroyed 232 modified exhaust pipes which had been confiscated from ‘young riders and gangsters’. POLICE

Police chief orders loud exhaust pipe clampdown

Phnom Penh municipal police chief and deputy National Police chief Sar Thet ordered all district police chiefs in the capital on Thursday to clamp down on the use of exhaust pipes that have been modified to make a loud noise.

Thet said the directive to Phnom Penh district police task forces was not a new thing, but it was necessary to remind them about the issue, which continued to be a problem.

When police detain motorbike riders with modified exhaust pipes, he said, they should only issue a warning.

However, when offenders are caught, Thet said their parents must be requested to sign a contract to promise the offence will not be repeated and the riders must be educated.

In addition, he ordered the police to prevent any motorbike racing and said there was a particular problem in this regard among students in Phnom Penh.

“I only reminded the police to look at this issue again and take action against young people who race motorbikes or ride with modified exhaust pipes especially at night, because it disturbs hospital patients and the elderly,” Thet said.

On Sunday, Banteay Meanchey provincial police destroyed 232 modified exhaust pipes which had been confiscated from “young riders and gangsters”, provincial police chief Ath Khem said when presiding over the event.

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

He urged the police to continue clamping down on the problem.

A National Police report said: “These modified exhaust pipes make a loud noise which disturbs people’s daily lives and affects public order – and they violate the Road Traffic Law.”

Banteay Meanchey traffic office chief Sorn Koemsuor said the destroyed exhaust pipes were confiscated by provincial traffic police and police task forces from nine towns and districts in the last five months.

He said the police did not punish the offenders but only asked them to sign a contract promising not to repeat their illegal activities.

Koemsuor said Article 66 of the Road Traffic Law stated that traffic police must ban such motorbikes from the road or hold them for a period of not more than three days for inspection and modification.

MOST VIEWED

  • PP massage parlours raided, 29 suspects held for prostitution

    The Phnom Penh municipal Military Police on Sunday raided four massage parlours in Por Sen Chey district and detained 29 suspects for questioning over their alleged involvement in prostitution. Deputy municipal Military Police commander Pu Davy on Monday said the four massage parlours were located near

  • PM: All 10 Asean countries to receive Rainsy arrest warrants

    Prime Minister Hun Sen said on Thursday that all 10 Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) member states will receive warrants for the arrest of Sam Rainsy. The warrants have already been sent to Laos and Thailand. He was speaking at a joint press conference at

  • Overtourism still threatens Angkor Wat

    Ticket sales to the Angkor temples are down. An Angkor Enterprise report has revealed that ticket sales to the Angkor Archaeological Park dropped by more than 11 per cent from the same period last year. Prime Minister Hun Sen isn’t concerned. He told journalists that

  • Human rights report biased, says Cambodia

    Cambodia has accused the 42nd session of the Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland on Wednesday of having “undermined the principle of objectivity”. In a statement issued on Tuesday, the Permanent Mission of the Kingdom of Cambodia to the UN said the Office of the