Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Prince gives riverside park design green light

Prince gives riverside park design green light

Prince gives riverside park design green light

A n estimated $140,000 will be needed to build a new riverside park in Phnom Penh

recently given the go-ahead by the government and supported by Prime Minister

Prince Ranariddh.

The park is part of the govern-ment's program of

upgrading the beauty of the capital and was to have been restored using a design

made with French support.

But Prince Ranariddh shelved this plan after

visiting the University of Fine Arts on Jan. 24-25 where he was impressed by new

designs produced by architecture students.

Groups of students had

produced plans covering all the park areas, including the river side site which

will blend the remains of the old park with a new one.

One student said

the groups with the best designs would merge their ideas and produce one plan

for the park. This would include statues of Khmer kings from the Angkor time,

said the student.

Sok Bonn is the head of parks and vegetation in the

Municipal Public Works Service. He said he hoped construction would start soon.

"We already have the decision from the government and now we are waiting for the

money to come down," he said.

Most of the money is needed to concrete

two chunks of the river bank which are collapsing and to build water and power

supplies for a recreation field. Trees and flowers will also be

grown.

Phnom Penh has 96.5 hectares of parks, numbering about 40 large

fields which include the Royal Palace, Independence Monument, Wat Phnom, the

Council of Ministers and the Defense Ministry. They turned to ruin during the

Khmer Rouge time.

Over the past decade, some 55 hectares have been

renovated but Sok Bonn said his department did not get enough money to maintain

the parks and it would take a couple of million dollars to fully restore them.

"Our government has no money, so we cannot reach the international level," he

complained.

One of the hindrances to the department's work is a

difficulty in maintaining the parks' beauty during the dry season when water

pressure is not strong enough. "We want the flowers to be alive all year round,"

said Sok Bonn.

He said renovating the parks would take another ten years

if the funding system remained the same but if enough cash was available then

"fast money, fast work" would see the work finished by 1996.

Sok Bonn

said, however, that no companies had been interested in providing help except a

Thai company which has renovated Pochentong Park.

MOST VIEWED

  • Oil producers see oversupply

    Major oil producers said on Sunday that crude supply next year would outstrip demand, calling for new strategies based on production adjustments. Khalid al-Falih, Energy Minister of the world’s top supplier Saudi Arabia, said the kingdom would cut its production by 500,000 barrels per day (

  • ‘Historic’ Khmer Rouge tribunal Case 002/2 verdict to be delivered

    The Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) are to deliver the verdict on Friday, in the trial of former Khmer Rouge leaders Nuon Chea and Khieu Samphan, in a pronouncement hailed as a “historic event for Cambodia and the world”. The verdict from

  • Record set for world’s longest dragon boat

    Cambodia broke the world record for the longest dragon boat – a title previously held by China, Guinness World Records adjudicator Pravin Patel said on Monday. He verified the record on the east bank of the Mekong river, in Prey Veng province’s Peamro district. “With

  • Analyst: Government appointments ‘a waste of national budget’

    The government has appointed over 200 officials as undersecretaries of state, secretaries of state, assistants and advisers at various institutions since October 1. While senior officials said the appointments were aimed at ensuring higher efficiency at the national level, social analysts said the practice is merely power-sharing