Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Program aims to raise traffic law awareness for youths

Program aims to raise traffic law awareness for youths

Program aims to raise traffic law awareness for youths

081215_05.jpg
081215_05.jpg

Phnom Penh schools launch campaign in a bid to reduce the number of young people driving motorbikes without licences

Photo by: HENG CHIVOAN

A traffic accident last week in Phnom Penh. Officials say licenses will help reduce accidents, especially among young people.

FOR the more than 800,000 motorbikes registered in Cambodia, only 14,000 driver's licences have been issued since the enforcement of traffic laws in 2007, according to transport officials, who are resorting to new tactics to increase knowledge of the Kingdom's road rules.

Keo Savin, director of land transport at the Ministry of Public Works and Transport,  said to motivate young people to get their licence, the ministry, in cooperation with Japanese development group JICA, are giving lessons on traffic laws at Phnom Penh, Bak Touk, Sisowath and Tuol Tumpoung high schools in a "trial program" before it is introduced into other areas.

"We must enforce the law strictly and encourage people to get motor driving licenses," he said.

Sok Sovanna, director of Bak Touk High School, said that the program, in which 1,000 students are being given traffic law lessons and a road rule test at the school through the month of December, was an important step in road safety education.

"The program is helpful for students to learn that they must drive with licences," he said.

"The fee for having a driving licence is only US$10," he said, adding that only those aged over 16 years can register for a licence.

No fine, no worries

Sann Socheata, road safety program manager at Handicap International Belgium, said that as long as there was no penalty for driving without a licence in Cambodia, thousands would continue to do so.  

"Until there is a fine, people will not care," she said.

She said she had noticed that young people from 15 to 24 were among the highest percentage of victims involved in traffic accidents.

"They are at risk of accidents because they drive without properly learning the traffic laws," she said, adding that since many Cambodians started driving at a young age, it was hard to enforce new habits.

"In Cambodia, even children under 16 drive motorbikes, which makes it very difficult for officials to encourage them to have licences," she said.

"According to the law, only those who are aged 16 and over are allowed to get licences."

MOST VIEWED

  • Hun Sen ready to ‘break record’, says Rainsy lost

    Caretaker prime minister Hun Sen used a meeting with 18,400 factory workers on Wednesday to predict that he would beat the record for being the world’s longest-serving non-royal leader. He also used the platform to slam political opponent Sam Rainsy who he said had lost

  • Sihanoukville land prices skyrocketing amid breakneck development

    Sihanoukville, the Kingdom’s most famous beach destination for tourists, is seemingly becoming a paradise for Chinese investors as well. The huge influx of Chinese investors has caused property values to rise, especially the price of land, which has nearly doubled in some places near

  • US names new ambassador to Cambodia

    US President Donald Trump on Friday appointed W Patrick Murphy as the new US Ambassador to Cambodia, replacing incumbent William A Heidt. A press release posted on the White House’s website said nominee W Patrick Murphy is currently acting principal deputy assistant secretary at

  • Kingdom is at a crossroads between East, West after poll

    It was dubbed a success by caretaker prime minister Hun Sen after the electoral victory of his Cambodian People’s Party (CPP), which is poised to take all seats in the National Assembly. But the July 29 national election has not been positively looked at by