Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Returnees from "down-under"

Returnees from "down-under"

Returnees from "down-under"

The first group of Cambodian boat people to return voluntarily from Australia flew

back to their impoverished, war-battered country Dec. 26, many after spending three

years in detention.

Relatives greeted the group of 17 returnees in emotional scenes of reunion at Phnom

Penh airport.

The 17 agreed to serve a "cooling off" period of one year in Cambodia before

reapplying for permanent resettlement in Australia.

"We've had the first arrival of the Cambodian boat people who've been held in

detention now, some for three years, some for two, some for one, depending when they

arrived in boats." Australian Ambassador John Hollo-way said.

"None of them qualified for refugee status," he said, adding that 250 Cambodians

remained in Australian immigration detention centres.

Holloway said 55 detainees had volunteered for Canberra's Special Assistance Programme

and he was hopeful the remaining boat people would accept the package.

Australian officials said most of the Cambodians held in detention were comparatively

wealthy and fled their homeland to escape the Vietnamese-installed communist government

of Hun Sen.

Individual returnees received a cash grant of U.S. $125 on leaving and would be given

a further U.S. $20 per month for the 12 months spent in Cambodia, Australian immigration

officials said.

"Quite frankly, they're all intending to return to Australia," one senior

official said.

Som Chan Vouthy, 31, who escaped from the southern port of Sihanoukville in 1991,

said he thought all of the remaining detainees would join the programme.

"I think the others will come back," he said. He said he had joined the

assistance programme because "Australian made a good law."

Asked if he intended returning to Australia, Vouthy said initially he "wasn't

sure" but later admitted he had already organized a sponsor.

In a meeting with Holloway, Ranariddh said he welcomed the return of the boat people

and promised no harm would come to them.

"Their rebellion in leaving their country might have been caused by the previous

regime but the present regime wasn't the sort of regime you would want to run away

from," Holloway quoted Ranariddh as saying.

Holloway dismissed claims that Canberra was trying to keep the issue out of the public

eye by repatriating the first group of boat people during the Christmas break, when

most Australians were on holiday.

"We were held up a bit by ensuring they would be welcomed black in Cambodia

and I needed the clearance from the government and I only obtained that a couple

of days ago," Holloway said.

"Cambodia doesn't think about Christmas. They are a non-Christian government,"

he said. -Reuters

MOST VIEWED

  • New US bill ‘is a violation of Cambodian independence’

    After a US congressmen introduced bipartisan legislation that will enact sanctions on Cambodian officials responsible for “undermining democracy” in the Kingdom, government officials and the ruling Cambodian People’s Party on Sunday said they regarded the potential action as the “violation of independence and sovereignty

  • Long way to go before Cambodia gets a ‘smart city’

    Phnom Penh, Siem Reap and Battambang will struggle to attain smart city status without adopting far reaching master plans, according to officials tasked with implementing the program. The brainchild of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean), the smart city program seeks to link up

  • Ministry’s plan for net sparks fears

    The government has ordered all domestic and international internet traffic in the Kingdom to pass through a Data Management Centre (DMC) that has been newly created by the state-owned Telecom Cambodia, in a move some have claimed is an attempt to censor government critics. Spokesman

  • China-Cambodia tourism forum held

    The Cambodian tourism sector must be prepared to welcome a growing number of Chinese tourists, as they lead the globe in the number of outbound travellers and were responsible for the most visitors to the Kingdom last year, the country’s tourism minister said on