Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Right breed and proper management can help boost production

Right breed and proper management can help boost production

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
CP Native Chicken contract farm (farmer)

Right breed and proper management can help boost production

Getting the right advice and assistance is easy with CP Cambodia as a business partner

Cambodia has a hot and humid tropical climate, in many ways the country is ideally suited to all kinds of agricultural endeavors from farming to raising livestock.

But those same conditions are also an ideal breeding ground for pathogens, bacteria and viruses that can accelerate the spread of disease -- and sometimes even allow them to jump from animal to human.

In general, animal diseases are not so different from human diseases; they can spread like wildfire. For example, bird flu caused a great loss of profit in livestock production business in many countries and hit a global epidemic, a few years ago after the H5N1 virus crossed from domestic chickens to humans, and was spread by travelers around the world.

These risks, however, can be minimized with right chicken breed and proper farm management techniques, according to Dr. Kriangsak Laosakul, Veterinarian at the Animal Health Department of CP Cambodia.

“Every farmer can be educated about modern prevention methods and practice according to the technical procedures provided by CP -- which includes how to raise chickens,” he said.

The farmer that partners up with CP Cambodia are assisted by a team of livestock experts. The company has implemented effective operational procedures that ensure the animals grow up healthy, and the farmer benefits.

CP have been specialists in breeding and developing the perfect livestock to raise in Cambodia’s tropical climate, sparing no attention to detail. It includes on how to select the breed that has the highest Average Daily Gain (AD G), lowest Feed Conversion Ration (FCR), and best Disease Resistance Chicken.

At present, native chicken or “morn-bey-sas” in Cambodia is highly in demand and CP have bred a healthy native chicken that tastes exactly for Khmer dishes. The CP native chicken, typically take 65 days to reach and weigh 1.2 kgs when slaughtered. Despite of their relative scrawniness, the chickens are favored for the delicate flavor and texture of meat.

But it isn’t just starting with the right breed that makes a successful chicken farmer, knowing how to properly house and feed the flock is just as important.

“CP Cambodia is available to offer technical help to farmers to provide ideal specifications for hutching and housings, as well as provide a team of animal husbandry experts to take care of their health needs, such as medicines and vaccination program.

“CP is happy to offer all sorts of technical and professional consultation. They also offer to help find business partners that will help with the financial aid for every Cambodian looking to start an animal husbandry business.”

MOST VIEWED

  • Hun Sen to ‘step down’ if he loses Sam Rainsy bet over Kem Sokha

    Hun Sen has promised to step down as prime minister while opposition figure Sam Rainsy pledges to turn himself in as forfeits if the long-term political rivals lose a “bet” over the future of former opposition leader Kem Sokha, who is on bail awaiting trial

  • UAE prince seeks to invest in Cambodia

    The UAE has expressed interest in Cambodian oil and gas exploration. Minister of Mines and Energy Suy Sem said this was the result of his discussions with Sheikh Ahmed bin Dalmook bin Juma al-Maktoum, a member of the royal family who visited him on Wednesday.

  • Smith calls for ‘release’ of Sokha as visit ends

    At a press conference to conclude her 11-day visit to Cambodia, UN Special Rapporteur for Human Rights in Cambodia Rhona Smith on Thursday called for treason charges against former opposition leader Kem Sokha to be dropped and for him to be released from “restricted detention”.

  • PM denies ‘nepotism’ claims

    Prime minister Hun Sen denied on Thursday that nepotism was involved in the recent promotions of the children of senior government officials. He said they had been “trained” and were entirely capable of carrying out their duties while being open to “punishment” like anyone else.