Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Siem Reap’s Wat Bo Primary School seen as model in Kingdom

Siem Reap’s Wat Bo Primary School seen as model in Kingdom

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Students perform a daily routine at Wat Bo Primary School in Siem Reap town. Photo supplied

Siem Reap’s Wat Bo Primary School seen as model in Kingdom

Wat Bo Primary School in Siem Reap town is considered a model school throughout the Kingdom and beyond, having made a name for itself for its well-mannered pupils, pleasant environment and attentive teachers.

Located in Sala Kamroeuk commune’s Wat Bo village, this academic year the school has 126 teachers and 6,444 students.

The school’s principal, Peng Kimchhen, had a tough upbringing and aims to help his pupils avoid such hardships.

He instils in teachers and students alike with standards of dignified behaviour, morals and virtue.

“To become a good leader, I follow one ‘don’t’ and five ‘dos’. Don’t be selfish. Do be willing, patient, hard-working, honest and devoted,” Kimchhen told The Post.

Teachers are not allowed to provide extra classes at the school or sell snacks in classes like at other state schools. Parking fees are banned and both pupils and teachers must comply with the school regulations. It is immediately noticed that students always put rubbish in bins, so the campus is litter-free.

Kimchhen said the school also helps poor students and those with mental health problems. “I have helped find funding for 500 to 600 students. And we appeal to other capable students to share what they can with those who are less fortunate,” he said.

Teachers at Wat Bo are required to meet certain standards, and 101 teachers hold bachelor’s degrees. They must also have a sound grasp of information and communications technology (ICT).

In addition to the curriculums approved by the Ministry of Education, the school also focuses on sports, music and art.

Teacher Touch Bondol said: “He [Kimchhen] always talks about morals, professionalism and a sense of duty.”

Kong San Ratana, the mother of three pupils, said they previously attended a private school. “Before, I was not interested in Wat Bo. But I visited with my aunt and saw how well organised it was.

“The students were respectful and polite – raising their hands and taking off their shoes,” she said, adding with a big smile: “There’s no rubbish either!”

MOST VIEWED

  • PP massage parlours raided, 29 suspects held for prostitution

    The Phnom Penh municipal Military Police on Sunday raided four massage parlours in Por Sen Chey district and detained 29 suspects for questioning over their alleged involvement in prostitution. Deputy municipal Military Police commander Pu Davy on Monday said the four massage parlours were located near

  • PM: All 10 Asean countries to receive Rainsy arrest warrants

    Prime Minister Hun Sen said on Thursday that all 10 Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) member states will receive warrants for the arrest of Sam Rainsy. The warrants have already been sent to Laos and Thailand. He was speaking at a joint press conference at

  • Overtourism still threatens Angkor Wat

    Ticket sales to the Angkor temples are down. An Angkor Enterprise report has revealed that ticket sales to the Angkor Archaeological Park dropped by more than 11 per cent from the same period last year. Prime Minister Hun Sen isn’t concerned. He told journalists that

  • Human rights report biased, says Cambodia

    Cambodia has accused the 42nd session of the Human Rights Council in Geneva, Switzerland on Wednesday of having “undermined the principle of objectivity”. In a statement issued on Tuesday, the Permanent Mission of the Kingdom of Cambodia to the UN said the Office of the