Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Sihanoukville trees make way for pavement

Sihanoukville trees make way for pavement

Sihanoukville trees make way for pavement

The price of progress? Trading trees for pavement, the city gears up

for its inevitable expansion.

H

undreds of trees have been cut away from the sides of Ekareach Blvd (Independence

Boulevard) in Sihanoukville to extend the width of the road.

Independence Blvd is currently 4.8 kilometers long and about 6 meters wide. Now the

municipality plans to extend the width of the road by three meters on each side.

To enable the extension, all the shade trees along the boulevard have been felled.

Third deputy governor of Sihanoukville Sboung Sarath, who is leading the rebuilding,

said that the road needed to be doubled in width in order to avoid traffic jams in

the seaside town.

He said the felled trees, which included coconut and flame trees, would be replaced

by flowering trees to beautify the coastal town.

He added there were three other reasons for cutting down the trees. First: to prevent

them falling down on the road when it is windy; secondly to prevent the dropping

of the ripe coconuts on the heads of people, especially children; and finally to

stop the destruction of the road.

Sihanoukville as residents and visitors will fondly remember it from the rapidly-receding 20th century - tranquil and pastoral.

Sarath estimates that the first part of the project will cost about $10,000 : to

cut the trees, dig up the roots and level the surrounding soil. The funding was provided

by the municipality and the people who live along the road.

The trees had been planted in the 1960s and had grown to between 8 and 12 meters

high since then.

Sarath had noted that there were two views on this issue, but said most people had

supported the clearing of the trees to avoid danger to their children, however a

small number of people seem to be critical of this action.

MOST VIEWED

  • Hong Kong firm done buying Coke Cambodia

    Swire Coca-Cola Ltd, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Hong Kong-listed Swire Pacific Ltd, on November 25 announced that it had completed the acquisition of The Coca-Cola Co’s bottling business in Cambodia, as part of its ambitions to expand into the Southeast Asian market. Swire Coca-Cola affirmed

  • Cambodia's Bokator now officially in World Heritage List

    UNESCO has officially inscribed Cambodia’s “Kun Lbokator”, commonly known as Bokator, on the World Heritage List, according to Minister of Culture and Fine Arts Phoeurng Sackona in her brief report to Prime Minister Hun Sen on the night of November 29. Her report, which was

  • NagaWorld union leader arrested at airport after Australia trip

    Chhim Sithar, head of the Labour Rights Supported Union of Khmer Employees at NagaWorld integrated casino resort, was arrested on November 26 at Phnom Penh International Airport and placed in pre-trial detention after returning from a 12-day trip to Australia. Phnom Penh Municipal Court Investigating Judge

  • Takeo hand-woven silk items provide local high-quality alternative to imports

    After graduating from university and beginning her career as a civil servant at the the Ministry of Economy and Finance, Khieu Sina found time to establish a business that aligns with her true passion – quality hand-woven Khmer goods. Her product line, known as Banteay Srei,

  • Sub-Decree approves $30M for mine clearance

    The Cambodian government established the ‘Mine-Free Cambodia 2025 Foundation’, and released an initial budget of $30 million. Based on the progress of the foundation in 2023, 2024 and 2025, more funds will be added from the national budget and other sources. In a sub-decree signed by Prime Minister Hun Sen

  • Two senior GDP officials defect to CPP

    Two senior officials of the Grassroots Democratic Party (GDP) have asked to join the Cambodian People’s Party (CPP), after apparently failing to forge a political alliance in the run-up to the 2023 general election. Yang Saing Koma, chairman of the GDP board, and Lek Sothear,