Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Son Sen and Yun Yat: living by the sword...

Son Sen and Yun Yat: living by the sword...

Son Sen and Yun Yat: living by the sword...

"THEY are the April 17 people, they must be arrested ... I don't know whether

the Northern committee has purged them all ... More detailed observation requested."

These notes, carefully written in thick red ink in the margins of a confession of

a Tuol Sleng victim, are believed to have been penned by Son Sen.

On June 10, at 2 am in the morning, the past of Son Sen, the silent executioner of

Tuol Sleng's estimated 12,000 victims, may finally have caught up with him.

It may have happened like this: As tensions within the party spilled over, his comrades

went to his house and killed him, his wife Yun Yat and 10 other persons. Then the

bodies were run over by trucks.

Pictures of bloody corpses, apparently including Son Sen, his face caught for eternity

in a chilling grimace, were then brandished by people in Phnom Penh as evidence of

the end of a bloody chapter of Cambodian history.

"This is the end of the Khmer Rouge. They are starting to kill each other,"

said First Prime Minister Prince Norodom Ranariddh on June 13.

Son Sen's past was equally bloody. He presided over the forced evacuation of Phnom

Penh's two million inhabitants after the capital fell to Khmer Rouge forces on April

17, 1975. During the Democratic Kampuchea regime, he took charge of security matters

including the Tuol Sleng detention center, reporting directly to Nuon Chea and Pol

Pot.

The trail of red ink recorded in documents collected at the Documentation Center

of Cambodia leads directly to Son Sen, according to the center's director.

"I have studied his initials, his signature, and handwriting for months by comparing

them with his handwriting and [his] signature [on] the Paris Peace Agreements.

"His name, his signature, his initials appear too many times, too many to refuse

to believe," said Chhang.

He said that he does not believe Son Sen is dead.

Controversy over the authenticity of the pictures grew in the days after they were

released to the press.

Funcinpec General Nhek Bun Chhay claimed, during a June 14, press conference that

the pictures were taken by Bun Chhay's bodyguards. But observers questioned that.

They found anomalies: fresh blood stains on the hands of Son Sen when most of the

other stains seemed to have been already dried; and the enlargments themselves. They

pointed out that there are no facilities in Phnom Penh to have such high-quality

enlargments made.

At least one person who was at the press conference, who knew Son Sen personally,

said he recognized Son Sen in the pictures.

According to other sources in Funcinpec, however, the photos were actually given

to the Cambodian Embassy in Bangkok by Thai military sources

During a June 22 speech, Second Prime Minister Hun Sen expressed his doubts that

the pictures were genuine.

"Even Son Sen's death is still a mystery," he said. "Who took the

pictures of Son Sen's death? They said that Son Sen was killed at night, but in the

pictures [taken later] the blood is still fresh."

"It did not look like Son Sen. I always met [him] at the Supreme National Council

meetings," he said.

MOST VIEWED

  • Chinese ‘prank’ threat video is no joke for Cambodia

    ‘Preah Sihanouk province, in the next three years, whether safe or chaotic, will be under my control,” declared a Chinese man in a white T-shirt, as another 19 men stood behind him shirtless, in a video that went viral on social media last month. After the

  • Woman detained for murder of hairdresser over unpaid $1K debt

    A woman has been held in connection with the murder of a 40-year-old widow. The victim’s daughter claims the motive was the suspect’s unpaid four million riel ($1,000) debt to her mother. The 17-year-old girl, Pich Sievmey, said her mother, Koem Yaneang, a hairdresser

  • ABA reports $71.8M net profit

    ABA Bank, a member of the National Bank of Canada group, recorded a net profit of $71.8 million last year, up 55 per cent from $46.2 million in 2017, its annual report released on Monday stated. A rise in the bank’s loan portfolio and the expansion of stated

  • ‘Life goes on’ if Cambodia loses Everything But Arms

    Cambodia's business sector is exploring ways to mitigate any fallout from a possible loss of access to the EU’s Everything But Arms (EBA) agreement as talks continue before the 28-member bloc makes a final decision. The EU monitoring process is set to conclude in