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Supreme Court upholds Kim Sok’s incitement verdict

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Political analyst Kim Sok is escorted by officials to his bail hearing in Phnom Penh last July. Sok, accused of saying that the CPP was responsible for the murder of fellow analyst Kem Sokha, on Friday, saw his incitement conviction upheld. Pha Lina

Supreme Court upholds Kim Sok’s incitement verdict

The Supreme Court upheld a conviction on Friday against political analyst Kim Sok, who was sentenced to 18 months jail for claiming that the ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) was behind the 2016 murder of well-known commentator, Kem Ley, according to the prosecuting lawyer.

Ky Tech, the CPP’s legal representative said after a hearing on Sunday, the Supreme Court made its decision to uphold the lower court’s decision which sentenced Kim Sok to 18 months and slapped him with a million riel [about $2,000] fine, in addition to 800 million riel [around $200,000] compensation he must pay to the CPP.

Sok was convicted in August last year for “incitement to commit a felony” and defamation for his claim, broadcast on Radio Free Asia (RFA), that the prime minister’s party was behind Ley’s assassination.

“But after doing those things, killing and other things, [they] finally killed Kem Ley, but people still stand up. So the last approach is using the legal way … the intention is not only on Sam Rainsy … their goal was to destroy the CNRP,” Sok said on RFA.

Sok’s defence lawyer, Choung Chou Ngy, said his client will complete his jail time in August, which was met with a response by Tech that the convicted would still have to pay compensation in full.

“Now, we don’t have to wait another month because the Supreme Court ruling is already in effect. We the complainant can request for enforcement of the decision in order to get the compensation,” Tech said.

Sok still faces an additional complaint filed by Tech for a second speech on RFA, stemming from his attempt to clarify remarks he initially made. Tech said the second case was still in the hands of the Phnom Penh Municipal Court.

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